May’s Joy and May’s Prunella:

Today, Joy and Prunella (aka Nellie) left for a new home in Alabama.

They will have a nice home with slightly warmer Winters, not much hotter Summers, and a place where they are valued for their historic pedigrees.

It is always crucial to us that our horses are placed with caring and competent people.

We are delighted that they will go to a Morgan Horse farm where they will be appreciated.  As they are no longer going to be on our For Sale page, I will post the historical pedigree information in another blog.  Stay tuned.

Advertisements

What type of Morgan Horses do we breed?

One more post for today.

Recently, I was asked about the type Morgan horses that we breed.

It is an interesting question…and has a complex, but simple, answer.

We breed for a family friendly, beautiful, intelligent, well-conformed horse that is historically a Morgan, but in a contemporary context.

We have very versatile Morgan horses. And we also know that the horse, itself, has preferences regarding the type of work (s)he does.

We utilize historically important bloodlines, as up close as possible, to achieve these results.

For Example: S. Onstar had been trained to ride Western by professional trainers and VERY beginner amateur grandchildren. As I said in an earlier posting about her, she had not been ridden for over a year when Amber rode her Hunt Seat (see the pictures). She still hasn’t worn a pair of shoes…and clearly can vary her motion.
She literally floats through the air with a super reach for Travis driving her Roadster (see pictures and the new video). She had plenty of natural up/down motion for Amber, more than typically Hunt Seat. But she carried the saddle happily, having only carried a Western saddle prior. She also has plenty of up/down motion as I drive her. She is constantly listening and thinking about what we are asking her to do, and wants to please.

On another path, we have been discussing May’s Prunella and May’s Joy with “Foundation” Morgan horse people who want their bloodlines and hope for a foal or two. Other of our horses are too much “show horse” for the Foundation people, who do not care for certain bloodlines.

Virtually all of our horses sold in the past have been trained and sold locally as trail mounts. But some could have had brilliant show careers.

A few have competed successfully in competitive and endurance trail events, in New England and in the Deep South.

Several have gone to be the basis of a new Morgan horse breeding farm.

Some have been crossed with Friesians, and Arabians, bringing their talents to those breeders specific plans.

Some have been sold to be fancy Parade horses…a job that requires patience and willingness to please with beautiful looks and the ability to carry a heavy load of tack and rider.

We have several National Caliber – Class A quality show horses that are hidden jewels waiting for the right person to come along. Horses that can be ridden/driven by a professional or by an amateur with success.

We expect all our horses to be cared for by a family of amateurs, including children.

We have horses with great hooves, good legs, wide chests, tiny ears and kind eyes. We have horses that are tall and horses that are more typically “morgan heights”, non-shod, pasture length hooves. 

We have solid blacks, dark and light chestnuts, gleaming bays. Stallions, mares, and geldings. weanlings to retirees.

In the past, we sold a gorgeous mare. She could have had almost any kind of show career, but sold to be a pleasure riding mount. While she was parked out by the barn, a gander chased his mate directly under her body, with squawks and spread wings. She didn’t flinch. SOLD.

Are our horses always perfect? No. Can they adapt to their humans’ requests? Usually. Is every horse capable of doing everything? Of course not. Do we have a wide range of styles and types of the Morgan Horse? Always. Read their individual pages. Look at their pictures and pedigrees.

We breed for horses that fulfill our motto:
Family Show Horses: Showy Family Horses.

A visit with the weanlings and their dams.

10/11/10:   The weanlings.

Yesterday was gorgeous weather and John and I took a brief walk around parts of the farm.

The weanlings are, as always, very cute.  The three young males: S. Ocoee (S. Sequoyah x NEJ Golddust Emma) a solid black; S. Double Feature (S. Echo’s Finale x Playday Rebecca); and S. Resonance (S. Echo’s Finale x NEJ Golddust Alice) almost a perfectly matched pair of chestnuts, were super friendly and inquisitive.  They each wanted their fair share of scratches. We brought bags of carrots for their dams, but it wouldn’t have mattered.  Emma, Becca, and Alice would have come to visit whether or not there were treats included.

We hadn’t taught carrots to the little guys yet and they had found the whole interaction with their mothers to be fascinating.  D F (Double Feature) decided to try some carrots too.  I took a large end and held it for him. He took tiny nibbles, like eating an ice cream cone, and seemed to like it quite well. Ocoee and Resonance were interested, but adopted a wait and see approach.

I don’t really like to give young horses treats other than handfuls of long grass.  The carrot pieces or horse treats can get lodged in their throat and make them very ill, even resulting in death.  But the way that D F nibbled along the large piece was perfectly safe.

It is always a pleasure to visit the various members of the herd. This is something that I don’t take enough time to do.  Knowing that these little fellows are here as a result of our careful planning and care of their parents and them is very fulfilling.  We are very pleased with how both S. Sequoyah’s and S. Echo’s Finale’s foals are turning out.  And, naturally, Emma, Becca, and Alice have a lot to do with that too!  It is important as a breeder to choose really nice mares in both physical and temperament characteristics; and then breed them to very nice stallions, recognizing all the positives and negatives that may result.  Too many people do not bother to think about the complex responsibility of the choices that they make.

Once Michael re-enforces some fencing, we will be weaning them this month.  We intend to put S. Fieldstone and S. Smoky Mountain in the pasture with them.  I’d put S. Celestial Array in too.  But I don’t think that he needs the extra grain that goes to the young colts.

When they are gelded and we have waited an appropriate amount of time, we’ll probably put their coming two year old sisters in with them for the winter. 

Hopefully, Elizabeth and I will have some new photos up on their pages soon.  We’ll keep you posted.

A new video on our Website: Sleipnir Onstar being driven

10/11/10:
There is a new video on S. Onstar’s page on our website. It is of Travis driving her last evening. Noel also took a few photos of her with Travis, John and I.

Go to her picture on our Home page/Horses for Sale page, and click on her photo. When her page comes up, there is a spot to click on Driving Video.

It loads in a reasonable amount of time over my air card in the house. Let us know if you have any problems, or questions.

It was a nice break to go down and drive her last evening. The weather had been gorgeous all day; but I hadn’t been feeling well. I was glad that I went; and had lots of fun once again watching her with Travis and John and driving her myself.

She is all show horse at work, but she stops on a dime and she follows Travis in and out of the barn like a companionable pet.

Don’t forget to watch the video of Sleipnir Celestial Array, also being driven.

10/08/2010: John’s and my second times driving S. Onstar

John & I went to drive Sleipnir Onstar again the other day.  She is so much fun; and so smart.  This was only the second time that she had more than one driver.  She learned from last time and understood that we are going to each drive her.  She has figured out that when Travis drives her; then John; and then I do (I let John go first this time) we want her to do different things. She’s a floating roadster for Travis and a Ladies’ pleasure driving mare for me, with a spectacular road trot.  And that flat footed walk…she does it just fine…

Onstar’s conformation is excellent, and her bloodlines are compatible with almost any current breeding program: Waseeka’s Nocturne, UVM Flash, Beamington, and Trophy.

She is very willing to please and loves carrots and tolerates kisses.

I drove S. Onstar for the very first time

Two more photos have been added to S. Onstar’s photo gallery.  They can be viewed through clicking on her photo at the For Sale “Home” page…or going to her Gallery in the www.ImagesnMemories.com site.  SMHF public gallery>> mares>>S. Onstar.

The photos are of my first time driving her EVER.  Only Travis has driven her before this. The picture of Travis running alongside us is because I had also NEVER driven in his ring before. 

The other picture is of us going down the rail. She floats at the trot and she goes FAST!  Travis said that I was holding her back, and she can actually go ALOT FASTER…it was fast enough for me!!

These two photos of her are still without shoes. No shoes ever.  No training aids ever.

Rhinestone could trot for miles…and Louise never tired; and both of them were quite speedy. But I think S. Onstar took the best from both parents.

John got to drive her too. But Elizabeth was having camera issues.  Hopefully, we’ll get some photos of John driving her soon.  And more photos of Travis too.

Onstar follows Travis around like a puppy.  The absolute best thing about her training with him, is that he has taught her to stop and stand still. She just floats along when she is trotting, and she is all speed when he asks her to be. However, when he asks her to stop, she does. And just stands in place. 

We are thinking that she may be our Roadster to Bike horse.  She doesn’t really want to flat foot walk.  You know how the Roadsters, and frankly some of the Pleasure Driving horses, won’t stand in the line-up.  Not this young lady.  Roadster to Bike horses cannot have a header in the ring. S. Onstar just stands in place for Travis, John or I. That’s off to a really good start.

In the pictures, you’ll see how nicely she stands in the cross-ties for clipping, and kid kisses too.

Another note about S. Onstar.

Some more recent photos of S. Onstar will be up on the site(s) soon.

I want to mention that in the photos of Amber (McGee) riding her Hunt Seat, and of her being long-lined and driving, she is bare-foot.

She has never been shod. Travis is planning on getting her shod next week.

In the meantime, the fabulous floating trot that she has is TOTALLY natural!!!!

Stay tuned for more about S. Onstar.