Sleipnir Explorer (B-L Rhinestone Kid x May’s Sweetie) and Amber McGee and others

May 5, 2011

Amber and Explorer are at their first Horse show of the 2011 season, The Dixie Cup, at the International Horse Park, in Conyers, Georgia.  Amber is in her last season as a Junior Exhibitor, and Explorer is her partner in showing in Morgan Hunter Pleasure and Equitation classes. They have several shows that they are planning on attending this year, some for the first time for us as exhibitors.

S. Explorer is a Dark Bay 2005 gelding with no white markings, who is approximately 14.3 hands + tall, with fairly low trimmed hooves.  He has been trained Western and Hunt Seat.  Amber has done most of the work herself, with some guidance, most recently from Sue Nerland, R’surene Morgans/Lancer Stables.

Explorer is For Sale, and is a proven high placer in Geldings In-hand and Reserve Champion  In-hand.  Because show season has started, and he is Amber’s primary mount, he may be purchased at any time, but he will not be available for pick-up until after The Grand Nationals in early October.

I’ve been promising Barb Goda every year that we’d have horses for Dixie Cup; and it seems like every year something comes up that we cannot.  So, this year we at least have one horse at the Show.

The Nerlands have Sleipnir Celestial Array on loan to be Chris’ show horse for this season.  Because they have three mares due to foal in a cluster, and Chris has been recovering from treatments, Array is not being shown as yet.  He also is a proven show horse and has been a winner in Geldings In-hand and as Show Champion In hand. Our geldings are quality enough to be a stallion, but we have too many stallions as it is…so, some get gelded to use in Junior Exhibitor and Amateur settings. S. Celestial Array (Hylee’s The Rage x Sleipnir Constellation, by B-L Rhinestone Kid) is a 2002 Deep Bay, with no white markings. He is trained Western, and for Pleasure Driving. Sue and Chris will be fine tuning him, and possibly using him in Hunt Seat for Chris, as well as Pleasure Driving for Chris.

In the meantime, we are tending and feeding Chris’ retired show gelding, R’surene Reparte, for them, and he is being used by Sue and Beth as leaders, for the Appalachian Riders Morgan Horse Youth Group, which is part of Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association.  The Youth Group is based here on Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm.

Sleipnir Fieldstone is due to make some show debuts this year.  It is his year for Liberty Classic, in September this year, although his brother and uncle will probably be there too. S. Fieldstone is a very dark Bay (2006) gelding with a small white star.  He is from B-L Rhinestone Kid’s last foal crop x NEJ Golddust Emma (Golddust Miner MC x May’s Sweetie).  Fieldstone drives, and has been ridden Western and Hunt Seat.

Last, but certainly not least in the Show Horses due out this year, is Sleipnir Onstar, (2003) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Louise) our Black driving mare. John has always wanted a Roadster to Bike horse and it looks like S. Onstar is it.  Unfortunately, due to rule changes, Morgan horses that were not shown in Roadster to Bike classes prior to 2003, are not eligible to be shown in some combination shows.  Amber has ridden her Hunt Seat, and a previous professional trainer had trained her for Western tack…But she is a FAST BLACK DRIVING HORSE.   So, it will be interesting to see where she will fit in this year.  She is being capably driven by Travis Olinger, and every now and then by John and I.  STAY TUNED!!!

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2011 Spring Open House and Plant Sale

2011 Spring Open House and Plant Sale

Saturday, April 9th, 2011

10:00am to 4:00pm

We are a small family farm.  We grow 98% of our plants ourselves.  Everything is organically grown and while we have some common varieties, we mostly concentrate on Unusual and Unique culinary herbs and HEIRLOOM and ethnic varieties of vegetable plants, especially Tomatoes and Peppers

We also have Blueberry bushes and some other fruiting plants and perennials.

We have limited space and only grow a small amount of each of many varieties.  We will have over 30 types of Heirloom, Ethnic and other Tomatoes; and over 75 types of sweet, mild to HOT peppers. We do take requests and deposits.

Antique Shop on the farm, with glass, china, vintage hats and jewelry +

Gift Certificates Available for any amount.

Also the largest herd of Registered Morgan Horses in the south. 

Foals to senior citizens; stallions, mares, and geldings.  Historic bloodlines in people-friendly, gorgeous, intelligent horses.  Mostly Blacks and Bays, some Chestnuts, and a Palomino.

The Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Youth Group, Appalachian Riders, will be presenting some of the horses during the Open House. 

House plants ON SALE NOW.

Open Tuesday to Saturday, 10:00am until 4:00 pm, year round

The Greenhouse At Morgan Lane

2214 Columbus Road, Delano, TN, 37325

Off Rte. 163-Bowater Road, Delano, TN, 37325 

use either McMinn County Routes 969 or 970

 

WATCH FOR SIGNS

 

GPS N 35° 16.039’ W 084° 36.236’

423 263 0824 Farm             423 284 0899 Cellular

www.TheGreenhouseAtMorganLane.com

www.TheShopsAtMorganLane.com

www.SleipnirMorganHorseFarm.com

Appalachian Riders, a new Youth Group for ages 6 through 21

Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm will be the site for most meetings of a new Youth group, for people interested in horses, especially the Morgan Horse.

Ages 6 through 18 boys and girls are invited to participate, members are welcome through age 21. Younger attendees will be considered on an individual basis.

You do not need to own a horse, or even a Morgan Horse, to belong to the Club.  Parents are welcome, and encouraged, to attend the meetings.

Susan Nerland, of Lancer Stables, home of R’surene Morgan Horses, Talbott,TN, an accomplished riding instructor and trainer of Morgan Horses and Elizabeth McGee, a member of the Denman Family of Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm will be the co-leaders.  Both ladies have had Morgan Horses for over thirty years.

The BRMHA youth club, Appalachian Riders, will be meeting at Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm in Delano,TN at 2pm, on Saturday, March 5, 2011.
The new club and plans for future meetings will be discussed.

Coming events will be discussed as well as the first activity, a one day seminar at UT on “The Horse: Head to Toe” on March 12.

If you are under the age of 21, or know someone who is, & would like to belong to this exciting group, please email Sue Nerland at lancerstables@charter.net to be placed on the newsletter list. You can reach Elizabeth McGee at ImagesnMemories@aol.com

Phone messages may be sent to the farm and Shops at Morgan Lane at 423 263 0824.

Also, if you have any news about you and your Morgan horse, you wish to share, please include that information in an email.

Further information can be seen at: www.BlueRidgeMorganHorseAssociation.yolasite.com

 

Gift Suggestions

Do you need a gift for the Horse lover in your family? These suggestions are mostly horse related. But they can be adapted for any sport or interest.
They require a bit of thought, but are mostly not very expensive.  We have some suggestions:

1. Subscription to a Horse Magazine or Breed Journal.
Some of the Horse magazines run great specials via the web. Also, you can pick up the latest copy(ies) at your local bookstore to wrap, and use the coupons inside the magazines to order the subscription.
The Morgan Horse Magazine is $31.50 for a year’s subscription. www.morganhorse.com , >>Breed Magazine. For all interests in the Morgan breed.
The Morgan Connection is more specifically for the Morgan Horse Show World. www.morganconnection.net
There are other breed specific magazines; and category specifics. I/we always give John a subscription to the Driving Digest and Membership in the American Driving Society. Off and on, we have also had a subscription to the Carriage Journal.

2. Speaking of memberships: The American Morgan Horse Association (see above) also has yearly memberships at various levels. There are definite benefits to belonging to a national breed association and having input about your giftee’s favorite breed.
If they have a favorite sport, such as driving, a membership to that organization is a gift that they can utilize all year long. John and I and some other family members and friends look forward to the magazines arrivals each month.

3. How about a membership to a local club. Our regional Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association has provided us with interesting meetings, good friends, and activites revolving around our communities and our favorite horse. You do not need to own a horse, or a horse of a particular breed to join most equine related clubs. There are lots of opportunities to gain knowledge and make friends. The memberships are often VERY reasonable, for instance: The Blue Ridge Club’s website is: www.blueridgemorganhorseassociation@yolasite.com Dues are $20 individual, $10 youth, $25 family, and $30 farm.
States or Regions almost always have clubs that you can obtain a gift membership from at reasonable prices. 

4. Equipment: One year we gave each of our grandchildren a grooming tote, with a colorful and unique halter, lead shank; and individual hoof picks, brushes, etc. This was not in-expensive (times 4) but they seemed to like having “their own” equipment, and it did last quite awhile before the supplies got inter-mingled.

Gift certificates towards equipment can be purchased also.
We give gift certificates to local and “bigger” tack and feed stores.

5. Ok, I have to say it: A horse! Normally, I do not believe in gifting any animal, from a kitten or puppy to a horse.
But, If you give the present by picture/and gift certificate…and let the person help choose…
If not a whole horse…
A lesson…
Or a seminar…
Or a video for a particular skill.

These ideas can all be upscaled or downscaled depending on the amounts that you have available to spend, and the people that you are spending it on. The memberships and subscriptions can be for an entire family, or just one person.
As your gift list expands or contracts, and your budget as well, these suggestions can be altered to fit the circumstances. And it shows the person that you are thinking about what interests them.

Enjoy your Holiday season, whatever your religious affiliation.  And have a Blessed and safe New Year, with lots of new ideas for having fun with family and friends, and whatever interests that you share.

2010 New York Regional Morgan Horse Show

Recently, John and I were able to combine a visit to Britta and San with a trip to the NYRMHS.

This was the first time that we have been to the Fairground, the Coliseum, and this particular Horse Show, although we had always wanted to come.

It is clear that this is a well-established show, used to its facility, and being run by a good team of volunteers, and professionals.

This was the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Show, and it was nice to see the historic photos and blurbs in the program; and to hear them mentioned by the announcer.

We have had Morgan Horses for over thirty years, and the “old” bloodlines and show people are very familiar to us even though we have not shown our horses for quite some time.

We did not have horses at the Show, or ties to anyone showing, professionals, or amateurs. What follows are some views from the stands. Dear Readers: Please remember that these notes are not meant to be totally inclusive; and we did not attend the entire show.

Some impressions that we have of the Show include:

It was nice to see our former Regional Director, Tony Lee, winning in the amateur driving class(es).

The Broadmoor team, Mike Goebig, Dwayne Knowles, and staff, consistently turn out a good-looking, athletic, well-trained, horse. (Disclaimer: We’ve never had a horse with them, and have no vested interest in their stable.) We see the gentlemen and their horses every year at the beginning of the season at the Dixie Cup, which they always support…and even early in the season the horses look good. Their record, of course, leads them to their choice of training candidates. But from the stands, over the years, whether they are presenting the horse, or it is an amateur customer doing the ring work, they and their staff are there on the rail and the horse knows, and appears to enjoy, its work. (Another disclaimer: “usually”).

Tony had a horse, Harper Lee, in a class that we missed. That’s Britta’s favorite author. Great southern name for a presumably great southern horse. Tony, love some of your creative naming! Especially, since our girls and I are all “Lees” for our middle names.

It was nice to see some other familiar faces around the barns and in the ring.

Harry Sebring also shows a consistently nice horse. We enjoyed the three horse Roadster To Bike class…but it was not like the ‘80’s with Harry and “Spence”.

It was great to see all the UVM bloodline horses in the ring, and to see Steve Davis presenting UVM horses.

The weanling NYMHSSSA futurity class was a demonstration of superb, seamless, ring management by Lynn, and Kathleen, Peeples…was it five weanlings they presented, and four called back?
THAT takes patience and skill!!!!! And good collegial relationships.

We cheered for Bernard Parker in his classes too. The Parkers know how to present great looking, talented horses to their best.

We always cheer for Judy Nason and her horses…Again, someone who consistently presents talented, beautiful, athletic horses. She moved to Ashby, MA after we left Gardner, MA…too bad. We would have enjoyed being neighbors!

We’ve known Ivan Beattie for at least as long as we’ve had Morgans. It is always good to see his friendly face and some descendents of his family’s breeding program. From before we owned a Morgan horse, through a successful AI breeding shipment, Ivan has been welcoming and friendly. Even when he has been tremendously busy at their farm, he has made us feel welcome, and made himself available to answer theoretical breeding questions, even when the questions come decades apart in time! Their program is well represented in our breeding philosophy: Ulendon, predominently through Orcland Leader, crossed with B-L Rhinestone Kid’s GET and Old Government.

It is also always a pleasure to watch Peggy Alderman show a horse. She bought the dam of our first horse, U C Spicy Lass (U C Marquis x U C Taffy) at about the same time that we purchased Spicy. Spicy had a white fleck in one eye, so Peggy didn’t get her, instead, or too. Thank goodness! Otherwise, we would have missed the most perfect FIRST family horse ever!!!

We’ve followed Peggy’s career from the early days, and watched her develop as a professional trainer, and a breeder. So talented; and a great breeder of nice horses.

Percy McDaniel, Mike Carpenter, Kathryn Schwartz all had some beautiful, talented horses on display.

We last saw fellow Massachusetts-ite Chris Casenti at the Atlanta AMHA convention, where she was a speaker in an Equitation session that we brought our three young grand-daughters to attend. Congratulations to her on a successful show. Training horses and junior exhibitors is tough work, and she always does it well.

I saw Nikki Rae Woodworth’s name in the program. She showed leadline/walk-trot at the same period as our daughters.

Someone “new” to us was in attendance. We had seen Dale Rickford at the new KY Morgan Horse Show, and noticed him again immediately at this show. He seems to have a quiet manner, while presenting a well-turned out horse.

I know I’m forgetting some long-time, talented trainers who were there. If I have, perhaps, my memory is faulty; or we didn’t see the classes. We were not at every session.

We got to see most of one class that R’Surene Dante was in; and his strong 2nd place in a solid 12 horse Novice Hunter Pleasure Horse class. He was bred by our friends from the Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association, Sue and Chris Nerland, Lancer Stables, Tennessee. www.BlueRidgeMorganHorseAssociation@yola-site.com

We were happy to see Suzy Lucine, and finally meet her husband! Suzy took the photos that we have used of our senior stallion, B-L Rhinestone Kid (1980 – 2009). He was a product of a well-known NY state breeding program, Big-Little Farm, the Berans. So, most of our herd descends from NE and NY. (Waseeka’s Showtime x B-L Brown Lace, by UVM Flash x O-At-Ka Sealect Lass).

We were disappointed that we did not get to see the Carriage Driving classes. In our short time in NY, we had to juggle schedules. Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association, of which John is the President, supports the Liberty Classic Horse Show at the Tri-State Exhibition Center in Cleveland, TN. We usually have a really nice Open Carriage Driving component to our show. Another BRMHA member is a leader in the Driving Pairs Forum.

Another one of our stallions, Exquisite Sir Echo, (Waseeka’s Peter Piper x Triton’s April Windy) (deceased) was acquired from another NY State Morgan breeder, Diana Saxton, Wheelhorse Morgans. We have a spectacular final son of his, Sleipnir Echo’s Finale, out of our champion show mare, Sleipnir Constellation (B-L Rhinestone Kid x U C Spicy Lass). His Yearlings and Weanlings are turning out very nicely.

It was interesting to see the in-state folks and their horses. We started our farm in New England, so we were familiar with the various N Eng. states’ residents; and we have been in the South for awhile, and getting to know folks and their breeding programs there. At the show, there were some “prefixes” that we were familiar with and many that are new to us.

In the year that Britta has moved to NY, I’ve read a bit of NY State Morgan Horse Society news and history.  The program once again was really helpful with the photos, ads, and bits of history. We met Valerie at the Tack Sale, and bought a NYMH Society Members’ Directory and that has also been, and will be, well read.

The 3 judge system for the NYSSA Morgans seemed to function well, including the 2 judges for the entire show, and John MacDonald, who is extremely knowledgeable about the characteristics of the Morgan and a highly competent judge.

We loved the weanling class that I mentioned before. As breeders, it is our favorite. NY breeders can be justly proud of their Get/Produce.

It must have been a thrill for the NY state folks; it certainly was for us, that a Mellin-Herrick grandchild was showing at the 50th anniversary show. I saw Fred prior to the class, and recognized him instantly. There was a TN Walking Horse (TWH) print by Jeanne Mellin at the Tack Sale…I didn’t get a chance to bring it back to TN, for the TWH people…

I wanted to have a child in the walk-trot class(es) just to win a book illustrated by Jeanne Mellin. We, naturally, have well read copies of her Morgan horse books.

There was some sadness attached to the show for us, when we were alerted by Barb Goda, that Tom and Charlene Hilgenberg’s son, Chris, had passed away. The Hilgenberg’s are long-time Morgan breeders’ and Tom had been an early supporter of Morgans in the Carriage Driving world. We have a mare, also via S. Constellation, from the Great Oaks’ breeding.

Our sympathies go out to Tom, Charlene, Heidi and the Great Oaks’ Family.

We will be joining the NYMH Society, with Britta as our representative, based in CNY. Hopefully, no one will need her services (as an Asst Professor of Infectious Diseases, at SUNY-Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse).

Please see her website and book about her blind dog, San, and his adventures on our farm. He has been gathering NY adventures for another book in the series. All the funds from purchases go to support charity, namely medical studies for clinical officers in Malawi. Books can be purchased via his website and on Amazon.

www.santhedog.com

San’s Adventures on Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm, by Britta L. Denman; photographs by Elizabeth L D McGee.