What type of Morgan Horses do we breed?

One more post for today.

Recently, I was asked about the type Morgan horses that we breed.

It is an interesting question…and has a complex, but simple, answer.

We breed for a family friendly, beautiful, intelligent, well-conformed horse that is historically a Morgan, but in a contemporary context.

We have very versatile Morgan horses. And we also know that the horse, itself, has preferences regarding the type of work (s)he does.

We utilize historically important bloodlines, as up close as possible, to achieve these results.

For Example: S. Onstar had been trained to ride Western by professional trainers and VERY beginner amateur grandchildren. As I said in an earlier posting about her, she had not been ridden for over a year when Amber rode her Hunt Seat (see the pictures). She still hasn’t worn a pair of shoes…and clearly can vary her motion.
She literally floats through the air with a super reach for Travis driving her Roadster (see pictures and the new video). She had plenty of natural up/down motion for Amber, more than typically Hunt Seat. But she carried the saddle happily, having only carried a Western saddle prior. She also has plenty of up/down motion as I drive her. She is constantly listening and thinking about what we are asking her to do, and wants to please.

On another path, we have been discussing May’s Prunella and May’s Joy with “Foundation” Morgan horse people who want their bloodlines and hope for a foal or two. Other of our horses are too much “show horse” for the Foundation people, who do not care for certain bloodlines.

Virtually all of our horses sold in the past have been trained and sold locally as trail mounts. But some could have had brilliant show careers.

A few have competed successfully in competitive and endurance trail events, in New England and in the Deep South.

Several have gone to be the basis of a new Morgan horse breeding farm.

Some have been crossed with Friesians, and Arabians, bringing their talents to those breeders specific plans.

Some have been sold to be fancy Parade horses…a job that requires patience and willingness to please with beautiful looks and the ability to carry a heavy load of tack and rider.

We have several National Caliber – Class A quality show horses that are hidden jewels waiting for the right person to come along. Horses that can be ridden/driven by a professional or by an amateur with success.

We expect all our horses to be cared for by a family of amateurs, including children.

We have horses with great hooves, good legs, wide chests, tiny ears and kind eyes. We have horses that are tall and horses that are more typically “morgan heights”, non-shod, pasture length hooves. 

We have solid blacks, dark and light chestnuts, gleaming bays. Stallions, mares, and geldings. weanlings to retirees.

In the past, we sold a gorgeous mare. She could have had almost any kind of show career, but sold to be a pleasure riding mount. While she was parked out by the barn, a gander chased his mate directly under her body, with squawks and spread wings. She didn’t flinch. SOLD.

Are our horses always perfect? No. Can they adapt to their humans’ requests? Usually. Is every horse capable of doing everything? Of course not. Do we have a wide range of styles and types of the Morgan Horse? Always. Read their individual pages. Look at their pictures and pedigrees.

We breed for horses that fulfill our motto:
Family Show Horses: Showy Family Horses.

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A new video on our Website: Sleipnir Onstar being driven

10/11/10:
There is a new video on S. Onstar’s page on our website. It is of Travis driving her last evening. Noel also took a few photos of her with Travis, John and I.

Go to her picture on our Home page/Horses for Sale page, and click on her photo. When her page comes up, there is a spot to click on Driving Video.

It loads in a reasonable amount of time over my air card in the house. Let us know if you have any problems, or questions.

It was a nice break to go down and drive her last evening. The weather had been gorgeous all day; but I hadn’t been feeling well. I was glad that I went; and had lots of fun once again watching her with Travis and John and driving her myself.

She is all show horse at work, but she stops on a dime and she follows Travis in and out of the barn like a companionable pet.

Don’t forget to watch the video of Sleipnir Celestial Array, also being driven.

10/08/2010: John’s and my second times driving S. Onstar

John & I went to drive Sleipnir Onstar again the other day.  She is so much fun; and so smart.  This was only the second time that she had more than one driver.  She learned from last time and understood that we are going to each drive her.  She has figured out that when Travis drives her; then John; and then I do (I let John go first this time) we want her to do different things. She’s a floating roadster for Travis and a Ladies’ pleasure driving mare for me, with a spectacular road trot.  And that flat footed walk…she does it just fine…

Onstar’s conformation is excellent, and her bloodlines are compatible with almost any current breeding program: Waseeka’s Nocturne, UVM Flash, Beamington, and Trophy.

She is very willing to please and loves carrots and tolerates kisses.

I drove S. Onstar for the very first time

Two more photos have been added to S. Onstar’s photo gallery.  They can be viewed through clicking on her photo at the For Sale “Home” page…or going to her Gallery in the www.ImagesnMemories.com site.  SMHF public gallery>> mares>>S. Onstar.

The photos are of my first time driving her EVER.  Only Travis has driven her before this. The picture of Travis running alongside us is because I had also NEVER driven in his ring before. 

The other picture is of us going down the rail. She floats at the trot and she goes FAST!  Travis said that I was holding her back, and she can actually go ALOT FASTER…it was fast enough for me!!

These two photos of her are still without shoes. No shoes ever.  No training aids ever.

Rhinestone could trot for miles…and Louise never tired; and both of them were quite speedy. But I think S. Onstar took the best from both parents.

John got to drive her too. But Elizabeth was having camera issues.  Hopefully, we’ll get some photos of John driving her soon.  And more photos of Travis too.

Onstar follows Travis around like a puppy.  The absolute best thing about her training with him, is that he has taught her to stop and stand still. She just floats along when she is trotting, and she is all speed when he asks her to be. However, when he asks her to stop, she does. And just stands in place. 

We are thinking that she may be our Roadster to Bike horse.  She doesn’t really want to flat foot walk.  You know how the Roadsters, and frankly some of the Pleasure Driving horses, won’t stand in the line-up.  Not this young lady.  Roadster to Bike horses cannot have a header in the ring. S. Onstar just stands in place for Travis, John or I. That’s off to a really good start.

In the pictures, you’ll see how nicely she stands in the cross-ties for clipping, and kid kisses too.

Sleipnir Onstar, a fancy Black Mare, Professional Quality and Amateur Safe

This is the first of two-three postings about Sleipnir Onstar.

There are new pictures posted on this site and more on www.ImagesnMemories.com  of Sleipnir Onstar.

This gorgeous solid black 2003 mare is a daughter of B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Louise, our former black Beamington-Trophy broodmare.

This photo session, including pictures of Amber (McGee) riding her Hunt Seat, was the first time that she had been ridden since last Autumn when she went to Travis Olinger for driving training. It may also be the first time that S. Onstar was ridden Hunt Seat. Our grand-daughters used to ride her Western, I believe.  She had had some professional training starting her under saddle and ground driving previously.  But mostly she had just been ridden by our grand-daughters here on the farm as a lesson horse.

Travis has had to battle a wet and cold Winter and wet and muddy Spring, but he and S. Onstar have been taking their time, and reaching a good place together. When he received her in training she had not been in a stall, or trained to the cross-ties (just single tied). She loved the inside stall for the above wet Winter! Adapting just fine.

S. Onstar is one of our only two remaining breeding age daughters of Rhinestone, (deceased) a Waseeka’s Showtime son x a UVM Flash daughter. Onstar deserves a Class-A, National caliber show home. She can really move! She may have a bright future as a roadster. She definitely will be a competitor in harness and under saddle. We sell our BEST and S. Onstar will be a star in any arena.

Stay tuned for more recent news and photos about S. Onstar.

Our complete Herd List – 2010: Pedigrees, Conformation and Temperament

Our horses are, for the most part, a firmly entrenched part of our family. But they are also a business. Our mission is to breed a versatile Morgan horse, with historic temperament and conformation, and to share them with current Morgan horse owners, and buyers new to the breed.  When you see our herd, you know that you are looking at a Morgan horse.  We specialize in protecting the historic bloodlines in a more modern horse package, versatile from the backyard to paths to the showring.

Some of the horses that we offer for sale are very old time style…given the fact that historic Morgans were of many different framework, I’ll elaborate and say of the “Figure” style.

Others are of a longer and leaner body style, also historic, and also decidedly Morgan.

We have a very small amount of “Lippitt” bloodlines, in a few horses.  While we understand the Lippitt breeders’ idealism, we believe in utilizing a wider gene pool. 

Our horses combine the best characteristics of various bloodlines, including: Old Government, through U C and U V M bloodlines, Beamington, Breezeway, Canfield, Courage of Equinox, Devan, Flyhawk, Mansfield, Orcland Leader +, Panfield, Trophy, Ulendon, Upwey Ben Don, and Waseeka – through Peter Piper and Showtime +   and so many more core stallions and mares, and historic breeding farms…

Numbers, and ages, of our horses:

11 Stallions, colts, and geldings – 2000 >>2010. Ten of the eleven are available for sale. Plus two geldings are available as agents for other owners, (1993 & 1994).

1 born in 2000; 1 born in 2002; 1 born in 2003; 2 born in 2004; 1 born in 2005; 1 born in 2006; 1 born in 2009  and 3 born in 2010.

18 mares, including 6 retired broodmares, and 3 leased broodmares, (includes 1 of the retired broodmares). 

Of these, eight of our mares are for sale; one of the leased mares is offered for sale; and another mare is offered as agents for other owners.  Also, some mares, not included on the For Sale List, are offered on ON FARM BROODMARE LEASE.

1 born in 1979 (a daughter of our first horse and The Matriarch!); 1 born in 1983; 5 born in 1988; 2 born in 1993; 1 born in 1994; 1 born in 1998; 1 born in 1999; 1 born in 2000; 1 born in 2003; 1 born in 2004; 1 born in 2006  and 2 born in 2009.

Each of the For Sale and At Stud horses has their own individual page.  Some of the mares only available for On Farm Breeding Leases are listed on the Breeding lease page.  Further information for them is available upon request.

Most of the pedigrees are linked to their individual pages.  Others will be up soon and are available upon request.

Our Motto for over thirty years:  Family Show Horses  : Showy Family Horses

See the complete list of Members of our Herd elsewhere on our website.  And let’s talk about pedigrees and conformation and temperament.

Morgan Horses in the South

Recently, I was looking at the statistics section of the members section of the American Morgan Horse Association website (AMHA) www.morganhorse.com.

There is lots of interesting information on the website, which is the official site for the Morgan Horse. You do not have to be a member to access a great deal of information about this magnificent animal from the site. But, being a member does provide extra benefits.

The site promotes all the aspects of the potential of the Morgan Horse. One of the prime characteristics of the Morgan is his/her versatility. There are so many ways to enjoy these wonderful companions: backyard pleasure; trails; endurance contests; work horses – cow horses to police mounts; carriage driving; hunter-jumpers; dressage; breeding to preserve and enhance bloodlines; and, of course, in the show ring; just to name a few ways to utilize the Morgan Horses’ talents.

But, back to statistics. We have lived in New England, the Mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. For the past fourteen years, we have been living in the South, specifically in Eastern Tennessee 

I was interested in the number of Morgan Horses that there are in Tennessee, and elsewhere in the South. When we moved here, we didn’t know anyone else who owned Morgan Horses.  Since then, we belong to, and/or support a couple different southern Morgan Horse clubs/associations.

There were 1,079 Tennesse Morgan horses in Total as of December 31, 2009, which accounted for approximately 1% (1.06%) of all the Morgan Horses in the world. Now, statistics may be off a bit due to unreported deaths, and non-registered births. But, we can assume that this is a fairly accurate picture. Of these, 275 are stallions; 558 are mares; and 246 are geldings.

We can play the six degrees of separation game; but that is still MANY more Morgan Horses than I can personally name here in Tennessee.

For those of you who are not members of the AMHA, and/or do not have access to the statistics, let me tell you some other statistics.

There are 507 Morgan Horses in Alabama (.50%); 1,136 Morgans in Georgia (1.11%); 1425 Morgans in Kentucky (1.40%); 1450 in North Carolina (1.42%); 421 in South Carolina (.41%); and Virginia has 1570 (1.54%). Louisiana has 211 (.21%) and Mississippi has 165 (.16%).
Florida, a special case, with many former Northern Morgan Horse owners and trainers, has the most in the South, 2002 or (1.96%).

State Stallions Mares Geldings Total %age
TN 275 558 246 1079 1.06%
AL 117 277 113   507    .50%
GA 227 585 324 1136 1.11%
KY 343 769 313 1425 1.40%
NC 284 732 434 1450 1.42%
SC   86 227 108 421 .41%
VA 265 835 470 1570 1.54%
LA   44 108   59 211 .21%
MS   46 68   51 165 .16%
FL 368 1011 623 2002 1.96%
Totals 2055 5170 2741 9966 9.77%

Statistics courtesy of the AMHA www.morganhorse.com

So, people with wonderful, versatile, beautiful, and smart Morgan Horses:   Please write and tell us how you enjoy being with your Morgan Horses…

And even more important, join your local state Morgan Horse club, and let people with and without a Morgan, know about your Morgan horse(s).

If you need information regarding the local associations, please contact the AMHA www.Morganhorse.com or us….we’ll connect you.

and please see the Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association website:  http://www.blueridgemorganhorseassociation.yolasite.com/  Sue Nerland, who has done a wonderful job with the website, just turned over webmaster duties to Michael McGee, who is putting his own touches to the site.

And come back often…it is a work in progress.