A new video on our Website: Sleipnir Onstar being driven

10/11/10:
There is a new video on S. Onstar’s page on our website. It is of Travis driving her last evening. Noel also took a few photos of her with Travis, John and I.

Go to her picture on our Home page/Horses for Sale page, and click on her photo. When her page comes up, there is a spot to click on Driving Video.

It loads in a reasonable amount of time over my air card in the house. Let us know if you have any problems, or questions.

It was a nice break to go down and drive her last evening. The weather had been gorgeous all day; but I hadn’t been feeling well. I was glad that I went; and had lots of fun once again watching her with Travis and John and driving her myself.

She is all show horse at work, but she stops on a dime and she follows Travis in and out of the barn like a companionable pet.

Don’t forget to watch the video of Sleipnir Celestial Array, also being driven.

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Sleipnir Onstar, a fancy Black Mare, Professional Quality and Amateur Safe

This is the first of two-three postings about Sleipnir Onstar.

There are new pictures posted on this site and more on www.ImagesnMemories.com  of Sleipnir Onstar.

This gorgeous solid black 2003 mare is a daughter of B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Louise, our former black Beamington-Trophy broodmare.

This photo session, including pictures of Amber (McGee) riding her Hunt Seat, was the first time that she had been ridden since last Autumn when she went to Travis Olinger for driving training. It may also be the first time that S. Onstar was ridden Hunt Seat. Our grand-daughters used to ride her Western, I believe.  She had had some professional training starting her under saddle and ground driving previously.  But mostly she had just been ridden by our grand-daughters here on the farm as a lesson horse.

Travis has had to battle a wet and cold Winter and wet and muddy Spring, but he and S. Onstar have been taking their time, and reaching a good place together. When he received her in training she had not been in a stall, or trained to the cross-ties (just single tied). She loved the inside stall for the above wet Winter! Adapting just fine.

S. Onstar is one of our only two remaining breeding age daughters of Rhinestone, (deceased) a Waseeka’s Showtime son x a UVM Flash daughter. Onstar deserves a Class-A, National caliber show home. She can really move! She may have a bright future as a roadster. She definitely will be a competitor in harness and under saddle. We sell our BEST and S. Onstar will be a star in any arena.

Stay tuned for more recent news and photos about S. Onstar.

Morgan Horses in the South

Recently, I was looking at the statistics section of the members section of the American Morgan Horse Association website (AMHA) www.morganhorse.com.

There is lots of interesting information on the website, which is the official site for the Morgan Horse. You do not have to be a member to access a great deal of information about this magnificent animal from the site. But, being a member does provide extra benefits.

The site promotes all the aspects of the potential of the Morgan Horse. One of the prime characteristics of the Morgan is his/her versatility. There are so many ways to enjoy these wonderful companions: backyard pleasure; trails; endurance contests; work horses – cow horses to police mounts; carriage driving; hunter-jumpers; dressage; breeding to preserve and enhance bloodlines; and, of course, in the show ring; just to name a few ways to utilize the Morgan Horses’ talents.

But, back to statistics. We have lived in New England, the Mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. For the past fourteen years, we have been living in the South, specifically in Eastern Tennessee 

I was interested in the number of Morgan Horses that there are in Tennessee, and elsewhere in the South. When we moved here, we didn’t know anyone else who owned Morgan Horses.  Since then, we belong to, and/or support a couple different southern Morgan Horse clubs/associations.

There were 1,079 Tennesse Morgan horses in Total as of December 31, 2009, which accounted for approximately 1% (1.06%) of all the Morgan Horses in the world. Now, statistics may be off a bit due to unreported deaths, and non-registered births. But, we can assume that this is a fairly accurate picture. Of these, 275 are stallions; 558 are mares; and 246 are geldings.

We can play the six degrees of separation game; but that is still MANY more Morgan Horses than I can personally name here in Tennessee.

For those of you who are not members of the AMHA, and/or do not have access to the statistics, let me tell you some other statistics.

There are 507 Morgan Horses in Alabama (.50%); 1,136 Morgans in Georgia (1.11%); 1425 Morgans in Kentucky (1.40%); 1450 in North Carolina (1.42%); 421 in South Carolina (.41%); and Virginia has 1570 (1.54%). Louisiana has 211 (.21%) and Mississippi has 165 (.16%).
Florida, a special case, with many former Northern Morgan Horse owners and trainers, has the most in the South, 2002 or (1.96%).

State Stallions Mares Geldings Total %age
TN 275 558 246 1079 1.06%
AL 117 277 113   507    .50%
GA 227 585 324 1136 1.11%
KY 343 769 313 1425 1.40%
NC 284 732 434 1450 1.42%
SC   86 227 108 421 .41%
VA 265 835 470 1570 1.54%
LA   44 108   59 211 .21%
MS   46 68   51 165 .16%
FL 368 1011 623 2002 1.96%
Totals 2055 5170 2741 9966 9.77%

Statistics courtesy of the AMHA www.morganhorse.com

So, people with wonderful, versatile, beautiful, and smart Morgan Horses:   Please write and tell us how you enjoy being with your Morgan Horses…

And even more important, join your local state Morgan Horse club, and let people with and without a Morgan, know about your Morgan horse(s).

If you need information regarding the local associations, please contact the AMHA www.Morganhorse.com or us….we’ll connect you.

and please see the Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association website:  http://www.blueridgemorganhorseassociation.yolasite.com/  Sue Nerland, who has done a wonderful job with the website, just turned over webmaster duties to Michael McGee, who is putting his own touches to the site.

And come back often…it is a work in progress.