BLACK Morgan Horses at Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm

Several people have asked us specifically about our Black Morgan Horses. So, here is a list of just the Black Morgans.
We do have have Dark and Light Chestnuts, Bays, and a Palomino on the farm.
The Black Morgan Horses include:

Reggie’s Black Rose 1999 Black Mare Trail, Broodmare, Show
Rose is a perfect Ambassadress of the Morgan breed. Sweet and willing. Rides, broodmare, very cute. Lots of trailering experience!

Sleipnir Onstar 2003 Black Mare Class A National Caliber
Onstar will be a star in anyone’s stable. Professionally trained to ride and drive. Currently ready for an exceptional season as a Roadster to Bike horse. Bloodlines and conformation to complement any breeding program. Exquisite and athletic. Show her under saddle or in harness.

Sleipnir Hiwassee 2009 Black Filly Ready to start driving training
Hiwassee, or “Meadow” as her Cherokee name translates, is an absolute sweetheart. Super friendly and willing to please, she’ll be right at the gate to greet you and go to work. A favorite of visitors.

*It is possible that two BLACK broodmares belonging to other owners might be available, ONLY sold together, and ONLY to a special home!!

* There is also another Black Bay mare, GAITED, belonging to other owners, off the farm, that is available. NEJ Golddust Sadie (1993). An especially interesting horse for here in the South! She has exceptional bloodlines for breeding use.

Sleipnir Sequoyah 2003 Black Stallion Class A National Caliber
Proven sire: 3 Blacks, 1 Dark Chestnut 3 G (two still colts): 1 M
Solid, athletic, fabulous temperament and conformation. He is pleasant to use for breeding; respects his handler and his mares. Would make a spectacular harness horse, or English Pleasure. Can be gelded.

Sleipnir Smoky Mountain 2009 Black colt-to be gelded Class A prospect
This colt will be tall and elegant, but on a solid foundation. He is friendly and willing. Ready for driving training. He has not been gelded yet, if looking for a stallion prospect, Smoky would make a fine one. Great temperament & conformation. Athletic. Loves carrots. SOLD to a wonderful home!

Sleipnir Ocoee 2010 Black colt-to be gelded From a favorite cross
Ocoee would be a good prospect for a possible driving pair with either Sleipnir Smoky Mountain or Sleipnir Hiwassee. He will be good sized and an athletic talented horse for whatever is asked of him. Ocoee has his parent’s solid build and temperament; and will be a friend/partner. SOLD to a wonderful home!

* There are also another two Black Geldings, NEJ Golddust St. Jaxx and NEJ Golddust Wilbur, belonging to other owners, off the farm, that are available. Both Jaxx (1993) and Wilbur (1994) have had some ground training, but have not been hooked or ridden, though they have had people on their backs. I recently saw Wilbur, and refreshed my memory about how large he is! Up close he resembles a Friesian…Tall and solid framework.
They are available separately or ask for a package with NEJ Golddust Sadie.

All of our Morgan Horses stand well for the farrier and the vet. At minimum, single tie for grooming; and are current on vaccinations, Negative Coggins, wormings, and can have an Interstate travel health certificate.

See their individual pages on our website for links to more photos and their complete pedigrees. Their pedigrees are also available on: www.allbreedpedigree.com

The Denman Family
Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm
2214 Columbus Road
Delano, TN, 37325
www.SleipnirMorganHorseFarm.com

  • Email: Denmanfam@aol.com
    423 263 5677 House
    423 284 0899 – Call or Text
    423 263 5425 Fax
    John, Georgia & Britta Denman
    Elizabeth, Michael, Amber, & Kimberly McGee
    Caitrin, Kaya, and Tre Bayard
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Morgan Horse Pedigrees visible online

Michael put all of the current For Sale Morgan Horses’ pedigrees in www.allbreedpedigrees.com
We really appreciate that effort…because if the scans of their papers are unclear, the typed in pedigrees should be easier to view.
If there is a horse missing, that you would like the pedigree for, please let us know…
He didn’t do some of the horses from the past.
Any corrections, let us know that too please.

Weaning the Foals from their dams:

Last Friday, October 30, 2010 we separated the foals (baby horses) from their dams (mothers).

At some point in time a mare would naturally wean her foal.  But we have seen older horses come and nurse from their mothers.  Usually we wean our foals at between 5 and 6 months of age.

When we separate them, we attempt to have the mares where their foals cannot see them and vice versa.

We usually put the dams and foals together in a large field after the foals are fairly sturdy on their legs.  So the foals all know each other and have established their own order of ranking in their mini herd. Their dams also know each other and their herd rank; and they start teaching the youngsters herd manners.

S. Valhalla (Hal), when he was alive, was the perfect babysitter- leader for the year’s foal crop.  From the time that they were weaned, until the next group was ready the following year, he would teach them more herd manners.

After Valhalla died, S. Selebrity (Seppy) held the job.  Seppy was not as patient with the frolicking of the youngsters as Hal had been.  But he got the job done with a minimum of unhappiness.

Since Seppy has been gone, we have tried some other methods. 

This year we gave the foals to the senior mares:  UC Cinnamon (Cinnie) (UVM Viking x UC Spicy Lass, our foundation mare)(1979); Sleipnir Constellation (Connie) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x UC Spicy Lass)(1983); and Coeur d’Alene (Alene) (Breezeway x Oak Hill Perfect Pic, a Funquest/Mor-Ayr Supreme mare) (1988).  All three of these fine quality mares have had important Produce (their foals) for our breeding farm.

One has to think twice about putting young colts, who have not been gelded as yet, in with mares. However, none of the mares can carry to term any longer; and we had retired them.  I do not recommend doing this with mares that could become “in foal”.  We know that even if they were impregnated by one of the young colts, they would not carry to term. Of course, they are not cycling, and I do not believe that they have for awhile; and they informed the colts to stay away!!!

One problem with this system is that we feed the senior mares a senior grain and a mineral supplement for their joints, which the foals do not need. And the foals get a regular grain, which if the mares try to claim some, will be more difficult for them to chew and digest.

So far the procedure is working out.  We put two separated feeders in their large paddock.  And each “set” is staying to their own feed. 

The colts have not been calling for their dams very much. And the dams are “drying out” (drying up their milk supply).

In about a week, we will return the mares to the main field (pasture).  The problem there is that the foals will only be separated from their mothers by about a 16 foot aisle.  So, the dams and foals could end up running the fence a lot, tiring them, or trying to break through to each other.  So, that will be a stage to watch carefully.  Presumably the whole process will go smoothly.

In the “old days” we didn’t have as many paddocks, and we stalled our horses more.  It was much more traumatic on everyone, especially the foals, to be confined in a space with no company.  This system is much more natural and humane, and yields a lot less crying for “Mama”.

Sleipnir Geldings: S. Celestial Array, S. Explorer, and S. Fieldstone and more:

I’ve been writing a lot about our wonderful mare S. Onstar lately, since John and I have just started driving her. And there are new stories to tell…she had her first show, which was a success.

So, I thought I would change topics and speak about our three mature geldings: S. Celestial Array (2002); S. Explorer (2005); and S. Fieldstone (2006); and our two fantastic deceased gelding family members, S. Valhalla and S. Selebrity.

Stallions, Mares, and Geldings have each held a central spot in our herd since the very beginning.  U C Spicy Lass (UC Marquis x UC Taffy) was our first horse, our first Morgan, and the focus for the beginning of our Morgan Horse breeding farm.

UC Spicy Lass’ first two foals for us were the wonderful gentlemen S. Valhalla (1980-2005) and S. Selebrity (1982-2008). These fellows were each gelded at approximately a year old.  They were John’s, Elizabeth’s and my Pleasure Driving Horses and Elizabeth, Caitrin and Britta’s Saddle Seat Equitation and English Pleasure mounts. They spent their entire lives as part of our family, although some of the time they were off at major show stables.

Spicy was in foal to UVM Viking (UVM Flash, an Upwey Ben Don son out of a Canfield daughter x UVM Kathy, a Ulendon and Panfield grand-daughter) when we purchased her from the University of Connecticut Morgan Horse program.  We intended to sell the foal to recoup part of her purchase price.  As with many breeds, Morgan horses usually carry a farm prefix as well as their name. When the foal arrived, we needed a prefix and a name for the foal, a colt.

We took inspiration from his sire’s name and out of a horse book that John and I had bought for the girls.

In the book was a mythological horse named Sleipnir.  He was the horse that carried the Viking warriors to Valhalla, their Heaven. He was depicted as having eight legs to show that he was strong and fleet of hoof.  So, the farm became Sleipnir and our first foal became Sleipnir’s Valhalla.

Of course, Valhalla was never sold. Valhalla (Hal) was the only foal on the farm.  Horses are herd animals, and after he was weaned, Hal was alone. We did not go searching for another horse; but we found B-L Rhinestone Kid and he found us.  Hal is buried here on our TN farm, having passed away at 25 y/o.  Seppy (S. Selebrity) is similarly buried here, passing away at 26 y/o; and B-L Rhinestone Kid, the sire of our herd for almost thirty years, is also buried here having followed his old friends last year at 29 y/o.

Sleipnir Celestial Array (2002) (Hylee the Rage x Sleipnir Constellation) is a grandson of both B-L Rhinestone Kid and U C Spicy Lass. Sleipnir Constellation was Rhinestone’s first foal and Spicy’s last.

“Array” has had a successful career in-hand so far, and has won Champion Morgan in-hand.  He had been trained professionally for Western Pleasure, but is currently working  Saddle Seat.  Noel and Michael worked with him quite a bit this Summer;  they and John and I have driven him. You can see photos and a video of Noel driving him on our website.

I have previously written about S. Explorer (2005) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x May’s Sweetie). Currently, Amber is riding S. Explorer Hunt Seat and the team is showing at some local, and at some Class A Morgan, Horse Shows. They always are in the ribbons for their rides. Sue Nerland, a veteran Morgan Horse owner and retired Equitation instructor, has taken Amber under her wing, and has been teaching her a better seat and hands, and utilizing Amber’s services to work horses at their stable.  Kimberly and Kaya, our other grand-daughters,  are also benefiting.

Explorer has had long-lining experience and dragged weight; but has not been hooked.  Array and Fieldstone both ride and drive.

S. Fieldstone (2006) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Emma) has been a farm visitors’ favorite since he was a colt. Even as a 2 y/o he was the center of a grooming demonstration by three active young boys, at one of our Open Barn Events.  He has gone to be a participant of a day on the farm program with 100s of First graders+ surrounding him for hours, and he has been ridden Western, Saddle Seat and Hunt Seat; and he has been driven.

These three geldings follow in the hoofbeats of Valhalla and Selebrity as “family show horses: showy family horses” (our motto from the beginning).  They follow from three decades of our studying pedigrees, and motion, and speaking with Morgan old-timers.

The 2009 and 2010 colts: S. Smoky Mountain (2009) (Sleipnir Sequoyah by B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Alice); S. Ocoee (2010)(Sleipnir Sequoyah x NEJ Golddust Emma); Sleipnir Double Feature (2010) (Sleipnir Echo’s Finale, out of S Constellation x Playday Rebecca); and Sleipnir Resonance (2010) (Sleipnir Echo’s Finale x NEJ Golddust Alice) will be the next athletic, intelligent, friendly and handsome geldings to follow the trail led by Valhalla and Selebrity.

Sleipnir Explorer and Amber

Amber has been S. Explorer’s (B-L Rhinestone Kid x May’s Sweetie) primary person. She has done almost all of his training on her own. Dawn K gave her advise and counseling. And, more recently, Sue N has been teaching Amber Equitation, especially for Hunt Seat; and Explorer has been at “Horse Camp” with Sue and Chris.

In only a few months, Amber’s seat and hands have dramatically improved. At Liberty Classic Horse Show this year, Amber asked Sue for some helpful suggestions. I wasn’t able to go to Liberty this year. But when Amber and Explorer returned home, they were already markedly better.

Sue took them on for a “project” and they disappeared to North TN for the Summer.

In the process, Amber and S. Explorer have been to a few more local shows and two major Morgan shows. They went to the KY Bluegrass Morgan Show; and the Morab Nationals, also at the KY Horse Park.

The team improves all the time, and have been always in the ribbons, in small classes and larger ones.

Today, was the Linsdale Horse Show. The last Linsdale Show for the year. Amber and Explorer had a good show; Blue ribbons, nice…but more importantly, S. Explorer picked up all his canter leads in his three classes; and had no errors.

It was a lovely day. We had visitors at the farm. We are recovering from the tornado/winds and rain at the beginning of the week; and Amber/Explorer’s probable last show of the year was a great success.

And all of this has been accomplished from the end of May until the end of October, including Amber being back in school for her Senior year.

We are proud of all of our grandchildren.

But we have to especially mention how hard Amber, and Explorer, worked this year, and how it has all paid off.

May’s Joy and May’s Prunella: Historic Pedigrees:

Joy and Nellie have gone to a new home.  But we wanted to post their historic pedigrees and information about them for their new owners, and for others interested in these Historic Foundation bloodlines.  They were bred by an old-time breeder; and have belonged to long-standing Morgan families.

MAY’S JOY                 (May’s Red x May’s Minuet)           BAY           1988

MAY’S PRUNELLA    (May’s Red x Eck’s Twiggy)         BAY           1988

These two mares are both products of Meril May of Mays Morgan Farm, Hiram, Ohio’s extensive classic mid-western breeding program, with many crosses to the excellent Devan bloodlines.

 They are definitely classically built “old style” mares.  These mares have extremely hard to find old bloodlines, up close.  Prior to coming to our farm, the ladies had been residing in Florida where they moved with prior owners, who had them for eleven years.

Both mares are by May’s Red, described as a tall, chunky, old-fashioned Morgan Stallion by a breed historian.  He was easy to handle, with a pleasant personality, and good mannered at breeding.

May’s Joy is out of May’s Minuet and May’s Prunella is out of Eck’s Twiggy.

Eck’s Twiggy is also the dam of the great driving mare, May’s Sweetie.  Sweetie is the dam of several terrific Produce for her people and for us.  She is true to her name and her foals definitely share that wonderful trait, sweet as can be, and wonderful to be around.

NEJ Golddust Alice, who is also on the sales list, and her 2009 black colt, Sleipnir Smoky Mountain (by Sleipnir Sequoyah), and her 2010 chestnut colt, Sleipnir Resonance (by Sleipnir Echo’s Finale) are all descendants of Eck’s Twiggy’s. 

Sleipnir Hiwassee, NEJ Golddust Emma’s 2009 black filly is another product of this line.  NEJ Golddust Emma, Alice’s full sister, is also the dam of a full brother to S. Hiwassee, (Sleipnir Sequoyah by B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Emma), Sleipnir Ocoee, a black 2010 colt.

May’s Joy who is 13.3 – 14 hh, had one foal, a filly, in 2002, Storm’s Mid-day Dance, by PJMF Stormy Knight, Matthew Gibson’s deceased stallion.

May’s Prunella (“Nellie”), who is taller, at 14.2 hh, has not foaled to our knowledge.  Nellie has an old injury to one leg.  She is usable for light riding. Both mares have been blood-typed and DNA confirmed and recorded.                            

Joy and ‘Nellie’ are both traditional Bay.  They both are trained to ride, and can be seen in their photos being ridden on our farm by a couple tiny young ladies.  We’ve been told that they were trained to drive…but they have not been hooked by us.  The mares are very friendly, come to you in a large pasture, and have good ground manners.  As all the horses on our farm, Joy and ‘Nellie’ are current on all vaccinations, wormings, Coggins, and the farrier.

These mares have only had a couple owners since birth.  We had them back in TN due to a divorce.  They went to the same home, as they have been together virtually since birth.  They are quite healthy and are capable of giving “pony rides” to grandchildren, and being ridden.

What type of Morgan Horses do we breed?

One more post for today.

Recently, I was asked about the type Morgan horses that we breed.

It is an interesting question…and has a complex, but simple, answer.

We breed for a family friendly, beautiful, intelligent, well-conformed horse that is historically a Morgan, but in a contemporary context.

We have very versatile Morgan horses. And we also know that the horse, itself, has preferences regarding the type of work (s)he does.

We utilize historically important bloodlines, as up close as possible, to achieve these results.

For Example: S. Onstar had been trained to ride Western by professional trainers and VERY beginner amateur grandchildren. As I said in an earlier posting about her, she had not been ridden for over a year when Amber rode her Hunt Seat (see the pictures). She still hasn’t worn a pair of shoes…and clearly can vary her motion.
She literally floats through the air with a super reach for Travis driving her Roadster (see pictures and the new video). She had plenty of natural up/down motion for Amber, more than typically Hunt Seat. But she carried the saddle happily, having only carried a Western saddle prior. She also has plenty of up/down motion as I drive her. She is constantly listening and thinking about what we are asking her to do, and wants to please.

On another path, we have been discussing May’s Prunella and May’s Joy with “Foundation” Morgan horse people who want their bloodlines and hope for a foal or two. Other of our horses are too much “show horse” for the Foundation people, who do not care for certain bloodlines.

Virtually all of our horses sold in the past have been trained and sold locally as trail mounts. But some could have had brilliant show careers.

A few have competed successfully in competitive and endurance trail events, in New England and in the Deep South.

Several have gone to be the basis of a new Morgan horse breeding farm.

Some have been crossed with Friesians, and Arabians, bringing their talents to those breeders specific plans.

Some have been sold to be fancy Parade horses…a job that requires patience and willingness to please with beautiful looks and the ability to carry a heavy load of tack and rider.

We have several National Caliber – Class A quality show horses that are hidden jewels waiting for the right person to come along. Horses that can be ridden/driven by a professional or by an amateur with success.

We expect all our horses to be cared for by a family of amateurs, including children.

We have horses with great hooves, good legs, wide chests, tiny ears and kind eyes. We have horses that are tall and horses that are more typically “morgan heights”, non-shod, pasture length hooves. 

We have solid blacks, dark and light chestnuts, gleaming bays. Stallions, mares, and geldings. weanlings to retirees.

In the past, we sold a gorgeous mare. She could have had almost any kind of show career, but sold to be a pleasure riding mount. While she was parked out by the barn, a gander chased his mate directly under her body, with squawks and spread wings. She didn’t flinch. SOLD.

Are our horses always perfect? No. Can they adapt to their humans’ requests? Usually. Is every horse capable of doing everything? Of course not. Do we have a wide range of styles and types of the Morgan Horse? Always. Read their individual pages. Look at their pictures and pedigrees.

We breed for horses that fulfill our motto:
Family Show Horses: Showy Family Horses.