What type of Morgan Horses do we breed?

One more post for today.

Recently, I was asked about the type Morgan horses that we breed.

It is an interesting question…and has a complex, but simple, answer.

We breed for a family friendly, beautiful, intelligent, well-conformed horse that is historically a Morgan, but in a contemporary context.

We have very versatile Morgan horses. And we also know that the horse, itself, has preferences regarding the type of work (s)he does.

We utilize historically important bloodlines, as up close as possible, to achieve these results.

For Example: S. Onstar had been trained to ride Western by professional trainers and VERY beginner amateur grandchildren. As I said in an earlier posting about her, she had not been ridden for over a year when Amber rode her Hunt Seat (see the pictures). She still hasn’t worn a pair of shoes…and clearly can vary her motion.
She literally floats through the air with a super reach for Travis driving her Roadster (see pictures and the new video). She had plenty of natural up/down motion for Amber, more than typically Hunt Seat. But she carried the saddle happily, having only carried a Western saddle prior. She also has plenty of up/down motion as I drive her. She is constantly listening and thinking about what we are asking her to do, and wants to please.

On another path, we have been discussing May’s Prunella and May’s Joy with “Foundation” Morgan horse people who want their bloodlines and hope for a foal or two. Other of our horses are too much “show horse” for the Foundation people, who do not care for certain bloodlines.

Virtually all of our horses sold in the past have been trained and sold locally as trail mounts. But some could have had brilliant show careers.

A few have competed successfully in competitive and endurance trail events, in New England and in the Deep South.

Several have gone to be the basis of a new Morgan horse breeding farm.

Some have been crossed with Friesians, and Arabians, bringing their talents to those breeders specific plans.

Some have been sold to be fancy Parade horses…a job that requires patience and willingness to please with beautiful looks and the ability to carry a heavy load of tack and rider.

We have several National Caliber – Class A quality show horses that are hidden jewels waiting for the right person to come along. Horses that can be ridden/driven by a professional or by an amateur with success.

We expect all our horses to be cared for by a family of amateurs, including children.

We have horses with great hooves, good legs, wide chests, tiny ears and kind eyes. We have horses that are tall and horses that are more typically “morgan heights”, non-shod, pasture length hooves. 

We have solid blacks, dark and light chestnuts, gleaming bays. Stallions, mares, and geldings. weanlings to retirees.

In the past, we sold a gorgeous mare. She could have had almost any kind of show career, but sold to be a pleasure riding mount. While she was parked out by the barn, a gander chased his mate directly under her body, with squawks and spread wings. She didn’t flinch. SOLD.

Are our horses always perfect? No. Can they adapt to their humans’ requests? Usually. Is every horse capable of doing everything? Of course not. Do we have a wide range of styles and types of the Morgan Horse? Always. Read their individual pages. Look at their pictures and pedigrees.

We breed for horses that fulfill our motto:
Family Show Horses: Showy Family Horses.

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Driving Horses

We have been focusing a lot recently on driving our horses. Elizabeth, John and I all prefer to drive.

Amber and Kimberly, Kaya and Tre have been a big help this year. Tre is particularly good with the foals…He’s just their size.

Amber has been riding a lot and really working some of the horses. If you see more pictures of her, it is because Kimberly and Kaya have both been out of town; and Kaya has knee problems typical of teenage girls growing taller!

Tim P. has been coming to work the stallions (we see him less now that it is HOT and he has a new job); and most especially Noel J and Michael M have been doing quite a bit of long lining, leading, and driving training.

John and I have enjoyed the times we’ve gotten to drive this year…and it is really neat seeing the grandkids and Elizabeth occasionally at the reins.

More driving pictures and driving training blogs to follow. Stay tuned. Elizabeth gives me lots of pictures to go through!

I specifically want to mention Noel (Jones) and Helen (Roeder)’s driving pairs discussion group. www.drivingpairs.com

They have had the group since 2006. It specifically focuses on driving pairs. So, if you have an interest in pairs, or multiples, this is THE place to go.

With all the interest in the 2010 World Equestrian Games this year in Lexington, KY, www.AlltechFEIgames.com, pair driving is going to be a topic of discussion in the horse world, and in general.

Noel, Helen, and the MANY MANY drivers of pairs will get you up to speed regarding the world of driving multiples!

FYI, it appears that you need a Google email account to actually join the discussion group…but you can see what’s going on via the link.

So, go check out their Discussion group…there is a vast archive of information, and current discussions on-going. Be careful being a newbie though…

There is no such thing as a “stupid” question…but look and see if they have already answered it in the Archives.

And if you have Single, or beginning, driving questions…write to us, here on the blog, or to Noel…

His email is: Gedeckt@usit.net

S. Echo’s Finale x Playday Rebecca’s newborn chestnut colt – photo page

We went through Elizabeth’s photo selections of the new little guy, and the proud Mom…and have a page of photos chosen.
Elizabeth has the page up for viewing.
You can get to it several ways, but here is a link…

http://www.imagesnmemories.com/Sleipnir-Morgan-Horse-Farm-1/2010-foals

He is wonderful…we are so very pleased with Echo and Rebecca’s additions to our breeding herd.