About the Horses For Sale

I was going over our Reg. Morgan Horses Sales/Production List with a bit more attention to statistics the other day.
We have approximately 2/3rds of our herd actively For Sale. There are others that we would consider selling. We also have four Morgan Horses, possibly more, For Sale for friends. We recently sold two for them.
Of these,
Three are Stallions, that could be gelded; they all have been ridden, and have driving training pre-hooking stage.
Four are already Geldings, who all can be ridden and two are actively driven. The other two have had driving training through the hooking stage, and now that the weather is cooler, we will be back to driving training.
Four are colts, that can be gelded. All four are quality enough to be left whole as Stallions. One is ready to start driving training.
Two are adult mares: One is all Show Horse. She rides and drives, and would be a perfect broodmare for any Morgan breeding farm. She could cross with any lines. The other is also broodmare quality, and a perfect trail friend. Good for a family horse, also.
Two are coming two year old fillies…both of which could be show horses; one would make an excellent trail horse. They would both be sparkling additions to breeding farms. They will be starting driving training. They are already good for the vet, farrier and amateur family members.
Regarding coat colors:
Four are chestnuts, Two are Dark chestnut, and it is too soon to tell with the other two, who are almost a perfect pair.
Six are true blacks.
Five are Bays ranging from gleaming Mahogany Bay to close to Seal Brown/Black Bay.
Of our friends’ horses for sale: three are Black to BlackBay; and one is a dark chestnut. Two are geldings and two are mares. One is the only proven broodmare that they have offered for sale in a very long time, if ever.
As always, our horses are handled by three generations of amateur owners, always including young children. They stand for the vet, farrier and grooming. All are up to date on vaccinations, wormings, and have negative Coggins.

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HORSES and HALLOWEEN – A bit belatedly…

I’ve been thinking about Horses and Halloween.
What immediately pops in your mind when you think of Horses and Halloween? Write and tell me, please.
Of course the most famous horse and Halloween is probably the horse belonging to the headless horseman in the Legend of Sleepy Hollow.  People only later remember that Ichabod Crane was also on a horse.

It was a lucky person who had their own horse at that time.  The horse was extremely important when it came to transportation, the military, and farm work.

One year, when our girls were in Junior High and Elementary School, a friend of the family dressed up as the Headless Horseman, rode one of the Morgan horses up to our pre-Revolutionary War home, and brought a lit up pumpkin as the head, and presented it to the kids at a Halloween Party. That is a great memory to look back on. It was about thirty some years ago.
In case you are wondering: www. Funtrivia.com states that the name of Ichabod Crane’s horse was: Gunpowder.
And http://www.thefleshfarm.com states that the name of the Headless Horseman’s horse in the Tim Burton movie version, is the same as the name of Brom Bones’ horse in the original story: Daredevil

But, it is a short story and it is a classic in many ways…

So, pick up a copy of Washington Irving’s Sketch Book  of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. (It also has the story of Rip Van Winkle) or pick up any later editions of the just the story…book, ereader, or audio…

or go to: http://www.bartleby.com/310/2/2.html and read the story there.

Washington Irving’s story was first published in 1819, almost 200 years ago.  That’s a long time to be scaring people!!!

Did you dress up your horse as a skeleton? or a carrot? or a zebra?
Let me know if you have any horse and Halloween memories…

Happy AUTUMN…

If you are going riding where it is Hunting Land…Wear ORANGE…

If you live somewhere near Hunting Land…and your horses are outside…put ORANGE on your horse(s)!

Weaning the Foals from their dams:

Last Friday, October 30, 2010 we separated the foals (baby horses) from their dams (mothers).

At some point in time a mare would naturally wean her foal.  But we have seen older horses come and nurse from their mothers.  Usually we wean our foals at between 5 and 6 months of age.

When we separate them, we attempt to have the mares where their foals cannot see them and vice versa.

We usually put the dams and foals together in a large field after the foals are fairly sturdy on their legs.  So the foals all know each other and have established their own order of ranking in their mini herd. Their dams also know each other and their herd rank; and they start teaching the youngsters herd manners.

S. Valhalla (Hal), when he was alive, was the perfect babysitter- leader for the year’s foal crop.  From the time that they were weaned, until the next group was ready the following year, he would teach them more herd manners.

After Valhalla died, S. Selebrity (Seppy) held the job.  Seppy was not as patient with the frolicking of the youngsters as Hal had been.  But he got the job done with a minimum of unhappiness.

Since Seppy has been gone, we have tried some other methods. 

This year we gave the foals to the senior mares:  UC Cinnamon (Cinnie) (UVM Viking x UC Spicy Lass, our foundation mare)(1979); Sleipnir Constellation (Connie) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x UC Spicy Lass)(1983); and Coeur d’Alene (Alene) (Breezeway x Oak Hill Perfect Pic, a Funquest/Mor-Ayr Supreme mare) (1988).  All three of these fine quality mares have had important Produce (their foals) for our breeding farm.

One has to think twice about putting young colts, who have not been gelded as yet, in with mares. However, none of the mares can carry to term any longer; and we had retired them.  I do not recommend doing this with mares that could become “in foal”.  We know that even if they were impregnated by one of the young colts, they would not carry to term. Of course, they are not cycling, and I do not believe that they have for awhile; and they informed the colts to stay away!!!

One problem with this system is that we feed the senior mares a senior grain and a mineral supplement for their joints, which the foals do not need. And the foals get a regular grain, which if the mares try to claim some, will be more difficult for them to chew and digest.

So far the procedure is working out.  We put two separated feeders in their large paddock.  And each “set” is staying to their own feed. 

The colts have not been calling for their dams very much. And the dams are “drying out” (drying up their milk supply).

In about a week, we will return the mares to the main field (pasture).  The problem there is that the foals will only be separated from their mothers by about a 16 foot aisle.  So, the dams and foals could end up running the fence a lot, tiring them, or trying to break through to each other.  So, that will be a stage to watch carefully.  Presumably the whole process will go smoothly.

In the “old days” we didn’t have as many paddocks, and we stalled our horses more.  It was much more traumatic on everyone, especially the foals, to be confined in a space with no company.  This system is much more natural and humane, and yields a lot less crying for “Mama”.

Sleipnir Geldings: S. Celestial Array, S. Explorer, and S. Fieldstone and more:

I’ve been writing a lot about our wonderful mare S. Onstar lately, since John and I have just started driving her. And there are new stories to tell…she had her first show, which was a success.

So, I thought I would change topics and speak about our three mature geldings: S. Celestial Array (2002); S. Explorer (2005); and S. Fieldstone (2006); and our two fantastic deceased gelding family members, S. Valhalla and S. Selebrity.

Stallions, Mares, and Geldings have each held a central spot in our herd since the very beginning.  U C Spicy Lass (UC Marquis x UC Taffy) was our first horse, our first Morgan, and the focus for the beginning of our Morgan Horse breeding farm.

UC Spicy Lass’ first two foals for us were the wonderful gentlemen S. Valhalla (1980-2005) and S. Selebrity (1982-2008). These fellows were each gelded at approximately a year old.  They were John’s, Elizabeth’s and my Pleasure Driving Horses and Elizabeth, Caitrin and Britta’s Saddle Seat Equitation and English Pleasure mounts. They spent their entire lives as part of our family, although some of the time they were off at major show stables.

Spicy was in foal to UVM Viking (UVM Flash, an Upwey Ben Don son out of a Canfield daughter x UVM Kathy, a Ulendon and Panfield grand-daughter) when we purchased her from the University of Connecticut Morgan Horse program.  We intended to sell the foal to recoup part of her purchase price.  As with many breeds, Morgan horses usually carry a farm prefix as well as their name. When the foal arrived, we needed a prefix and a name for the foal, a colt.

We took inspiration from his sire’s name and out of a horse book that John and I had bought for the girls.

In the book was a mythological horse named Sleipnir.  He was the horse that carried the Viking warriors to Valhalla, their Heaven. He was depicted as having eight legs to show that he was strong and fleet of hoof.  So, the farm became Sleipnir and our first foal became Sleipnir’s Valhalla.

Of course, Valhalla was never sold. Valhalla (Hal) was the only foal on the farm.  Horses are herd animals, and after he was weaned, Hal was alone. We did not go searching for another horse; but we found B-L Rhinestone Kid and he found us.  Hal is buried here on our TN farm, having passed away at 25 y/o.  Seppy (S. Selebrity) is similarly buried here, passing away at 26 y/o; and B-L Rhinestone Kid, the sire of our herd for almost thirty years, is also buried here having followed his old friends last year at 29 y/o.

Sleipnir Celestial Array (2002) (Hylee the Rage x Sleipnir Constellation) is a grandson of both B-L Rhinestone Kid and U C Spicy Lass. Sleipnir Constellation was Rhinestone’s first foal and Spicy’s last.

“Array” has had a successful career in-hand so far, and has won Champion Morgan in-hand.  He had been trained professionally for Western Pleasure, but is currently working  Saddle Seat.  Noel and Michael worked with him quite a bit this Summer;  they and John and I have driven him. You can see photos and a video of Noel driving him on our website.

I have previously written about S. Explorer (2005) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x May’s Sweetie). Currently, Amber is riding S. Explorer Hunt Seat and the team is showing at some local, and at some Class A Morgan, Horse Shows. They always are in the ribbons for their rides. Sue Nerland, a veteran Morgan Horse owner and retired Equitation instructor, has taken Amber under her wing, and has been teaching her a better seat and hands, and utilizing Amber’s services to work horses at their stable.  Kimberly and Kaya, our other grand-daughters,  are also benefiting.

Explorer has had long-lining experience and dragged weight; but has not been hooked.  Array and Fieldstone both ride and drive.

S. Fieldstone (2006) (B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Emma) has been a farm visitors’ favorite since he was a colt. Even as a 2 y/o he was the center of a grooming demonstration by three active young boys, at one of our Open Barn Events.  He has gone to be a participant of a day on the farm program with 100s of First graders+ surrounding him for hours, and he has been ridden Western, Saddle Seat and Hunt Seat; and he has been driven.

These three geldings follow in the hoofbeats of Valhalla and Selebrity as “family show horses: showy family horses” (our motto from the beginning).  They follow from three decades of our studying pedigrees, and motion, and speaking with Morgan old-timers.

The 2009 and 2010 colts: S. Smoky Mountain (2009) (Sleipnir Sequoyah by B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Alice); S. Ocoee (2010)(Sleipnir Sequoyah x NEJ Golddust Emma); Sleipnir Double Feature (2010) (Sleipnir Echo’s Finale, out of S Constellation x Playday Rebecca); and Sleipnir Resonance (2010) (Sleipnir Echo’s Finale x NEJ Golddust Alice) will be the next athletic, intelligent, friendly and handsome geldings to follow the trail led by Valhalla and Selebrity.

New Gelding on the Farm

We are welcoming a new gelding to the farm.

Bramble Creek Katzpyjamas (aka “PJ”), a 1998 liver chestnut gentleman has been professionally trained to the hooking stage; and has been trained to be ridden Western. 

We are looking forward to training him as a pleasure driving/carriage driving horse; and having the grandkids ride him.  Amber has already been for a short ride, and PJ performed well.

We have 4 colts to geld, once fly season has ended, one 2009 (Smoky) and three 2010 (Ocoee, DF and Resonance).  We are still debating gelding one of the older stallions.  We do not need four to eight stallions. At one point we didn’t have enough geldings.  Pretty soon we will have more stallions and geldings than mares.

Currently, on the farm, the mares out-number the stallions/geldings…but it is getting closer.

If someone is looking for a new stallion for a breeding farm, all four of the youngsters are nice enough to be a stallion.  They’ll all be gelded over the Winter though as Geldings are often desired.  So if you are looking for a mature, breedable stallion, we have three that we will consider selling, a black, a bay, and a Mahogany bay.  And if you are looking for a younger version, we have four, two blacks and two chestnuts.  

If you are looking for a horse that is already a gelding we have four: three bays, and a chestnut. 

If you want a young gelding, we will work with you regarding which of the four colts that you would like, and gelded.

If you would prefer a mare we have those too.

Plus, several friends of ours have Morgan horses for sale. Geldings and mares.

Whether you are new to Morgan Horses, or a Morgan Horse Breeder…we probably have, or can find, just the right horse for you.

Sleipnir Explorer and Amber

Amber has been S. Explorer’s (B-L Rhinestone Kid x May’s Sweetie) primary person. She has done almost all of his training on her own. Dawn K gave her advise and counseling. And, more recently, Sue N has been teaching Amber Equitation, especially for Hunt Seat; and Explorer has been at “Horse Camp” with Sue and Chris.

In only a few months, Amber’s seat and hands have dramatically improved. At Liberty Classic Horse Show this year, Amber asked Sue for some helpful suggestions. I wasn’t able to go to Liberty this year. But when Amber and Explorer returned home, they were already markedly better.

Sue took them on for a “project” and they disappeared to North TN for the Summer.

In the process, Amber and S. Explorer have been to a few more local shows and two major Morgan shows. They went to the KY Bluegrass Morgan Show; and the Morab Nationals, also at the KY Horse Park.

The team improves all the time, and have been always in the ribbons, in small classes and larger ones.

Today, was the Linsdale Horse Show. The last Linsdale Show for the year. Amber and Explorer had a good show; Blue ribbons, nice…but more importantly, S. Explorer picked up all his canter leads in his three classes; and had no errors.

It was a lovely day. We had visitors at the farm. We are recovering from the tornado/winds and rain at the beginning of the week; and Amber/Explorer’s probable last show of the year was a great success.

And all of this has been accomplished from the end of May until the end of October, including Amber being back in school for her Senior year.

We are proud of all of our grandchildren.

But we have to especially mention how hard Amber, and Explorer, worked this year, and how it has all paid off.

May’s Joy and May’s Prunella: Historic Pedigrees:

Joy and Nellie have gone to a new home.  But we wanted to post their historic pedigrees and information about them for their new owners, and for others interested in these Historic Foundation bloodlines.  They were bred by an old-time breeder; and have belonged to long-standing Morgan families.

MAY’S JOY                 (May’s Red x May’s Minuet)           BAY           1988

MAY’S PRUNELLA    (May’s Red x Eck’s Twiggy)         BAY           1988

These two mares are both products of Meril May of Mays Morgan Farm, Hiram, Ohio’s extensive classic mid-western breeding program, with many crosses to the excellent Devan bloodlines.

 They are definitely classically built “old style” mares.  These mares have extremely hard to find old bloodlines, up close.  Prior to coming to our farm, the ladies had been residing in Florida where they moved with prior owners, who had them for eleven years.

Both mares are by May’s Red, described as a tall, chunky, old-fashioned Morgan Stallion by a breed historian.  He was easy to handle, with a pleasant personality, and good mannered at breeding.

May’s Joy is out of May’s Minuet and May’s Prunella is out of Eck’s Twiggy.

Eck’s Twiggy is also the dam of the great driving mare, May’s Sweetie.  Sweetie is the dam of several terrific Produce for her people and for us.  She is true to her name and her foals definitely share that wonderful trait, sweet as can be, and wonderful to be around.

NEJ Golddust Alice, who is also on the sales list, and her 2009 black colt, Sleipnir Smoky Mountain (by Sleipnir Sequoyah), and her 2010 chestnut colt, Sleipnir Resonance (by Sleipnir Echo’s Finale) are all descendants of Eck’s Twiggy’s. 

Sleipnir Hiwassee, NEJ Golddust Emma’s 2009 black filly is another product of this line.  NEJ Golddust Emma, Alice’s full sister, is also the dam of a full brother to S. Hiwassee, (Sleipnir Sequoyah by B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Emma), Sleipnir Ocoee, a black 2010 colt.

May’s Joy who is 13.3 – 14 hh, had one foal, a filly, in 2002, Storm’s Mid-day Dance, by PJMF Stormy Knight, Matthew Gibson’s deceased stallion.

May’s Prunella (“Nellie”), who is taller, at 14.2 hh, has not foaled to our knowledge.  Nellie has an old injury to one leg.  She is usable for light riding. Both mares have been blood-typed and DNA confirmed and recorded.                            

Joy and ‘Nellie’ are both traditional Bay.  They both are trained to ride, and can be seen in their photos being ridden on our farm by a couple tiny young ladies.  We’ve been told that they were trained to drive…but they have not been hooked by us.  The mares are very friendly, come to you in a large pasture, and have good ground manners.  As all the horses on our farm, Joy and ‘Nellie’ are current on all vaccinations, wormings, Coggins, and the farrier.

These mares have only had a couple owners since birth.  We had them back in TN due to a divorce.  They went to the same home, as they have been together virtually since birth.  They are quite healthy and are capable of giving “pony rides” to grandchildren, and being ridden.