Sleipnir Onstar, a fancy Black Mare, Professional Quality and Amateur Safe

This is the first of two-three postings about Sleipnir Onstar.

There are new pictures posted on this site and more on www.ImagesnMemories.com  of Sleipnir Onstar.

This gorgeous solid black 2003 mare is a daughter of B-L Rhinestone Kid x NEJ Golddust Louise, our former black Beamington-Trophy broodmare.

This photo session, including pictures of Amber (McGee) riding her Hunt Seat, was the first time that she had been ridden since last Autumn when she went to Travis Olinger for driving training. It may also be the first time that S. Onstar was ridden Hunt Seat. Our grand-daughters used to ride her Western, I believe.  She had had some professional training starting her under saddle and ground driving previously.  But mostly she had just been ridden by our grand-daughters here on the farm as a lesson horse.

Travis has had to battle a wet and cold Winter and wet and muddy Spring, but he and S. Onstar have been taking their time, and reaching a good place together. When he received her in training she had not been in a stall, or trained to the cross-ties (just single tied). She loved the inside stall for the above wet Winter! Adapting just fine.

S. Onstar is one of our only two remaining breeding age daughters of Rhinestone, (deceased) a Waseeka’s Showtime son x a UVM Flash daughter. Onstar deserves a Class-A, National caliber show home. She can really move! She may have a bright future as a roadster. She definitely will be a competitor in harness and under saddle. We sell our BEST and S. Onstar will be a star in any arena.

Stay tuned for more recent news and photos about S. Onstar.

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2010 New York Regional Morgan Horse Show

Recently, John and I were able to combine a visit to Britta and San with a trip to the NYRMHS.

This was the first time that we have been to the Fairground, the Coliseum, and this particular Horse Show, although we had always wanted to come.

It is clear that this is a well-established show, used to its facility, and being run by a good team of volunteers, and professionals.

This was the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Show, and it was nice to see the historic photos and blurbs in the program; and to hear them mentioned by the announcer.

We have had Morgan Horses for over thirty years, and the “old” bloodlines and show people are very familiar to us even though we have not shown our horses for quite some time.

We did not have horses at the Show, or ties to anyone showing, professionals, or amateurs. What follows are some views from the stands. Dear Readers: Please remember that these notes are not meant to be totally inclusive; and we did not attend the entire show.

Some impressions that we have of the Show include:

It was nice to see our former Regional Director, Tony Lee, winning in the amateur driving class(es).

The Broadmoor team, Mike Goebig, Dwayne Knowles, and staff, consistently turn out a good-looking, athletic, well-trained, horse. (Disclaimer: We’ve never had a horse with them, and have no vested interest in their stable.) We see the gentlemen and their horses every year at the beginning of the season at the Dixie Cup, which they always support…and even early in the season the horses look good. Their record, of course, leads them to their choice of training candidates. But from the stands, over the years, whether they are presenting the horse, or it is an amateur customer doing the ring work, they and their staff are there on the rail and the horse knows, and appears to enjoy, its work. (Another disclaimer: “usually”).

Tony had a horse, Harper Lee, in a class that we missed. That’s Britta’s favorite author. Great southern name for a presumably great southern horse. Tony, love some of your creative naming! Especially, since our girls and I are all “Lees” for our middle names.

It was nice to see some other familiar faces around the barns and in the ring.

Harry Sebring also shows a consistently nice horse. We enjoyed the three horse Roadster To Bike class…but it was not like the ‘80’s with Harry and “Spence”.

It was great to see all the UVM bloodline horses in the ring, and to see Steve Davis presenting UVM horses.

The weanling NYMHSSSA futurity class was a demonstration of superb, seamless, ring management by Lynn, and Kathleen, Peeples…was it five weanlings they presented, and four called back?
THAT takes patience and skill!!!!! And good collegial relationships.

We cheered for Bernard Parker in his classes too. The Parkers know how to present great looking, talented horses to their best.

We always cheer for Judy Nason and her horses…Again, someone who consistently presents talented, beautiful, athletic horses. She moved to Ashby, MA after we left Gardner, MA…too bad. We would have enjoyed being neighbors!

We’ve known Ivan Beattie for at least as long as we’ve had Morgans. It is always good to see his friendly face and some descendents of his family’s breeding program. From before we owned a Morgan horse, through a successful AI breeding shipment, Ivan has been welcoming and friendly. Even when he has been tremendously busy at their farm, he has made us feel welcome, and made himself available to answer theoretical breeding questions, even when the questions come decades apart in time! Their program is well represented in our breeding philosophy: Ulendon, predominently through Orcland Leader, crossed with B-L Rhinestone Kid’s GET and Old Government.

It is also always a pleasure to watch Peggy Alderman show a horse. She bought the dam of our first horse, U C Spicy Lass (U C Marquis x U C Taffy) at about the same time that we purchased Spicy. Spicy had a white fleck in one eye, so Peggy didn’t get her, instead, or too. Thank goodness! Otherwise, we would have missed the most perfect FIRST family horse ever!!!

We’ve followed Peggy’s career from the early days, and watched her develop as a professional trainer, and a breeder. So talented; and a great breeder of nice horses.

Percy McDaniel, Mike Carpenter, Kathryn Schwartz all had some beautiful, talented horses on display.

We last saw fellow Massachusetts-ite Chris Casenti at the Atlanta AMHA convention, where she was a speaker in an Equitation session that we brought our three young grand-daughters to attend. Congratulations to her on a successful show. Training horses and junior exhibitors is tough work, and she always does it well.

I saw Nikki Rae Woodworth’s name in the program. She showed leadline/walk-trot at the same period as our daughters.

Someone “new” to us was in attendance. We had seen Dale Rickford at the new KY Morgan Horse Show, and noticed him again immediately at this show. He seems to have a quiet manner, while presenting a well-turned out horse.

I know I’m forgetting some long-time, talented trainers who were there. If I have, perhaps, my memory is faulty; or we didn’t see the classes. We were not at every session.

We got to see most of one class that R’Surene Dante was in; and his strong 2nd place in a solid 12 horse Novice Hunter Pleasure Horse class. He was bred by our friends from the Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association, Sue and Chris Nerland, Lancer Stables, Tennessee. www.BlueRidgeMorganHorseAssociation@yola-site.com

We were happy to see Suzy Lucine, and finally meet her husband! Suzy took the photos that we have used of our senior stallion, B-L Rhinestone Kid (1980 – 2009). He was a product of a well-known NY state breeding program, Big-Little Farm, the Berans. So, most of our herd descends from NE and NY. (Waseeka’s Showtime x B-L Brown Lace, by UVM Flash x O-At-Ka Sealect Lass).

We were disappointed that we did not get to see the Carriage Driving classes. In our short time in NY, we had to juggle schedules. Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association, of which John is the President, supports the Liberty Classic Horse Show at the Tri-State Exhibition Center in Cleveland, TN. We usually have a really nice Open Carriage Driving component to our show. Another BRMHA member is a leader in the Driving Pairs Forum.

Another one of our stallions, Exquisite Sir Echo, (Waseeka’s Peter Piper x Triton’s April Windy) (deceased) was acquired from another NY State Morgan breeder, Diana Saxton, Wheelhorse Morgans. We have a spectacular final son of his, Sleipnir Echo’s Finale, out of our champion show mare, Sleipnir Constellation (B-L Rhinestone Kid x U C Spicy Lass). His Yearlings and Weanlings are turning out very nicely.

It was interesting to see the in-state folks and their horses. We started our farm in New England, so we were familiar with the various N Eng. states’ residents; and we have been in the South for awhile, and getting to know folks and their breeding programs there. At the show, there were some “prefixes” that we were familiar with and many that are new to us.

In the year that Britta has moved to NY, I’ve read a bit of NY State Morgan Horse Society news and history.  The program once again was really helpful with the photos, ads, and bits of history. We met Valerie at the Tack Sale, and bought a NYMH Society Members’ Directory and that has also been, and will be, well read.

The 3 judge system for the NYSSA Morgans seemed to function well, including the 2 judges for the entire show, and John MacDonald, who is extremely knowledgeable about the characteristics of the Morgan and a highly competent judge.

We loved the weanling class that I mentioned before. As breeders, it is our favorite. NY breeders can be justly proud of their Get/Produce.

It must have been a thrill for the NY state folks; it certainly was for us, that a Mellin-Herrick grandchild was showing at the 50th anniversary show. I saw Fred prior to the class, and recognized him instantly. There was a TN Walking Horse (TWH) print by Jeanne Mellin at the Tack Sale…I didn’t get a chance to bring it back to TN, for the TWH people…

I wanted to have a child in the walk-trot class(es) just to win a book illustrated by Jeanne Mellin. We, naturally, have well read copies of her Morgan horse books.

There was some sadness attached to the show for us, when we were alerted by Barb Goda, that Tom and Charlene Hilgenberg’s son, Chris, had passed away. The Hilgenberg’s are long-time Morgan breeders’ and Tom had been an early supporter of Morgans in the Carriage Driving world. We have a mare, also via S. Constellation, from the Great Oaks’ breeding.

Our sympathies go out to Tom, Charlene, Heidi and the Great Oaks’ Family.

We will be joining the NYMH Society, with Britta as our representative, based in CNY. Hopefully, no one will need her services (as an Asst Professor of Infectious Diseases, at SUNY-Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse).

Please see her website and book about her blind dog, San, and his adventures on our farm. He has been gathering NY adventures for another book in the series. All the funds from purchases go to support charity, namely medical studies for clinical officers in Malawi. Books can be purchased via his website and on Amazon.

www.santhedog.com

San’s Adventures on Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm, by Britta L. Denman; photographs by Elizabeth L D McGee.

AMHA & ADS, the websites and the FEI World Singles Driving Championships.

There is a weekly News Brief from the American Morgan Horse Association (AMHA). 

If you belong to the AMHA and wish to subscribe to the Weekly News Brief which is free and delivered to your email:  click on: http://multibriefs.com/optin.php?amha  

If that link which I followed does not work for you…go to the www.morganhorse.com and contact them to sign up.  The News Brief is published by a company named MultiBriefs for the AMHA.

If you do not belong to the AMHA, or just want to check occasionally to see what is happening in the large world of the Morgan Horse…Go to www.morganhorse.com click on News, Dates and Events for News in General.  All the same news appears to be there.

Several of us here on the farm prefer to drive our horses with a cart.  So, I am always interested in Morgan Horse Driving News.

Two Morgan Horse enthusiasts and their Morgan Horses are representing the USA in team and individual competition in the FEI World Singles Driving Championships.

They are now in Italy with their Morgan Horses for a competition starting today, July 30th and ending on Aug. 1st.

You can read more about them using either method above.

Also, The American Driving Society, which John has been a member of for years (a membership for your favorite person is a convenient Birthday gift!) is doing a photo series following the U S Team.  The photos from trailering to practice sessions can be seen at www.americandrivingsociety.com

Our best wishes to all the members of the TEAM.

AND YEA!! For the Morgans!!

Our complete Herd List – 2010: Pedigrees, Conformation and Temperament

Our horses are, for the most part, a firmly entrenched part of our family. But they are also a business. Our mission is to breed a versatile Morgan horse, with historic temperament and conformation, and to share them with current Morgan horse owners, and buyers new to the breed.  When you see our herd, you know that you are looking at a Morgan horse.  We specialize in protecting the historic bloodlines in a more modern horse package, versatile from the backyard to paths to the showring.

Some of the horses that we offer for sale are very old time style…given the fact that historic Morgans were of many different framework, I’ll elaborate and say of the “Figure” style.

Others are of a longer and leaner body style, also historic, and also decidedly Morgan.

We have a very small amount of “Lippitt” bloodlines, in a few horses.  While we understand the Lippitt breeders’ idealism, we believe in utilizing a wider gene pool. 

Our horses combine the best characteristics of various bloodlines, including: Old Government, through U C and U V M bloodlines, Beamington, Breezeway, Canfield, Courage of Equinox, Devan, Flyhawk, Mansfield, Orcland Leader +, Panfield, Trophy, Ulendon, Upwey Ben Don, and Waseeka – through Peter Piper and Showtime +   and so many more core stallions and mares, and historic breeding farms…

Numbers, and ages, of our horses:

11 Stallions, colts, and geldings – 2000 >>2010. Ten of the eleven are available for sale. Plus two geldings are available as agents for other owners, (1993 & 1994).

1 born in 2000; 1 born in 2002; 1 born in 2003; 2 born in 2004; 1 born in 2005; 1 born in 2006; 1 born in 2009  and 3 born in 2010.

18 mares, including 6 retired broodmares, and 3 leased broodmares, (includes 1 of the retired broodmares). 

Of these, eight of our mares are for sale; one of the leased mares is offered for sale; and another mare is offered as agents for other owners.  Also, some mares, not included on the For Sale List, are offered on ON FARM BROODMARE LEASE.

1 born in 1979 (a daughter of our first horse and The Matriarch!); 1 born in 1983; 5 born in 1988; 2 born in 1993; 1 born in 1994; 1 born in 1998; 1 born in 1999; 1 born in 2000; 1 born in 2003; 1 born in 2004; 1 born in 2006  and 2 born in 2009.

Each of the For Sale and At Stud horses has their own individual page.  Some of the mares only available for On Farm Breeding Leases are listed on the Breeding lease page.  Further information for them is available upon request.

Most of the pedigrees are linked to their individual pages.  Others will be up soon and are available upon request.

Our Motto for over thirty years:  Family Show Horses  : Showy Family Horses

See the complete list of Members of our Herd elsewhere on our website.  And let’s talk about pedigrees and conformation and temperament.

Four kittens for Sale: Hemingways with extra digits.

Kittens for sale: Hemingway cats, with either extra digits, or the gene for extra digits.

We usually let a four paws with double digits female have about 1-2 litters, and then spay her. Four kittens/young cats available.

“J”/ “Jibble”, is a black, neutered male — No double paws. Under a year old, he has all his shots, as well as being neutered. Slender and sleek, he is: $45.00

“Lucy”, a small black female—with extra digits on her front paws. Small and fluffy, Lucy, about 8 months old, has all her shots and is not spayed. $35.00

“Kick” is a fluffy, long-haired, orange/white, female. No double paws, no shots, not spayed, she is about 4 months old. $20.00

“Blizzard” is a longer haired white male. No double paws, no shots, non-neutered, he is a litter-mate of “Kick”, about 4 months old.$15.00

all raised as inside cats for first months of their lives.  currently outdoor cats. currently dry food…raised on canned food and “kitten chow”.

photos to follow shortly.

call or email us:  423 263 0824  or email: DenmanFam@aol.com

Morgan Horses in the South

Recently, I was looking at the statistics section of the members section of the American Morgan Horse Association website (AMHA) www.morganhorse.com.

There is lots of interesting information on the website, which is the official site for the Morgan Horse. You do not have to be a member to access a great deal of information about this magnificent animal from the site. But, being a member does provide extra benefits.

The site promotes all the aspects of the potential of the Morgan Horse. One of the prime characteristics of the Morgan is his/her versatility. There are so many ways to enjoy these wonderful companions: backyard pleasure; trails; endurance contests; work horses – cow horses to police mounts; carriage driving; hunter-jumpers; dressage; breeding to preserve and enhance bloodlines; and, of course, in the show ring; just to name a few ways to utilize the Morgan Horses’ talents.

But, back to statistics. We have lived in New England, the Mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. For the past fourteen years, we have been living in the South, specifically in Eastern Tennessee 

I was interested in the number of Morgan Horses that there are in Tennessee, and elsewhere in the South. When we moved here, we didn’t know anyone else who owned Morgan Horses.  Since then, we belong to, and/or support a couple different southern Morgan Horse clubs/associations.

There were 1,079 Tennesse Morgan horses in Total as of December 31, 2009, which accounted for approximately 1% (1.06%) of all the Morgan Horses in the world. Now, statistics may be off a bit due to unreported deaths, and non-registered births. But, we can assume that this is a fairly accurate picture. Of these, 275 are stallions; 558 are mares; and 246 are geldings.

We can play the six degrees of separation game; but that is still MANY more Morgan Horses than I can personally name here in Tennessee.

For those of you who are not members of the AMHA, and/or do not have access to the statistics, let me tell you some other statistics.

There are 507 Morgan Horses in Alabama (.50%); 1,136 Morgans in Georgia (1.11%); 1425 Morgans in Kentucky (1.40%); 1450 in North Carolina (1.42%); 421 in South Carolina (.41%); and Virginia has 1570 (1.54%). Louisiana has 211 (.21%) and Mississippi has 165 (.16%).
Florida, a special case, with many former Northern Morgan Horse owners and trainers, has the most in the South, 2002 or (1.96%).

State Stallions Mares Geldings Total %age
TN 275 558 246 1079 1.06%
AL 117 277 113   507    .50%
GA 227 585 324 1136 1.11%
KY 343 769 313 1425 1.40%
NC 284 732 434 1450 1.42%
SC   86 227 108 421 .41%
VA 265 835 470 1570 1.54%
LA   44 108   59 211 .21%
MS   46 68   51 165 .16%
FL 368 1011 623 2002 1.96%
Totals 2055 5170 2741 9966 9.77%

Statistics courtesy of the AMHA www.morganhorse.com

So, people with wonderful, versatile, beautiful, and smart Morgan Horses:   Please write and tell us how you enjoy being with your Morgan Horses…

And even more important, join your local state Morgan Horse club, and let people with and without a Morgan, know about your Morgan horse(s).

If you need information regarding the local associations, please contact the AMHA www.Morganhorse.com or us….we’ll connect you.

and please see the Blue Ridge Morgan Horse Association website:  http://www.blueridgemorganhorseassociation.yolasite.com/  Sue Nerland, who has done a wonderful job with the website, just turned over webmaster duties to Michael McGee, who is putting his own touches to the site.

And come back often…it is a work in progress.

Bluegrass Morgan Classic Horse Show, Lexington, KY

Many of us were recently at the inaugural Bluegrass Morgan Classic Horse Show at the Kentucky Horse Park.

Amber (McGee) and Sleipnir Explorer and Chris Nerland and R’surene Reparte were showing.

Sue and Chris have taken Amber & Explorer under their wing; and Amber has been helping them work their horses.

The helpful hints that Sue passed on to Amber at the Liberty Classic Horse Show; and Amber’s assisting them at the Show, led to Sue deciding to take Amber on as probably her last student – passing on her wealth of knowledge.

Amber’s Summer of working horses on our farm changed dramatically to hours of saddle training and horsemanship instruction from Sue and saddle work when back home at our farm. Horse(s) and rider have all benefitted.

Explorer has his first set of shoes, and a longer hoof. He has also become more acclimated to stalls, and turnout paddocks. He misses Amber when she’s home at the farm, but loves the attention from Chris and Sue. He is a total trooper with on and off loading on the trailer and travelling distances.

Michael has been gaining helpful hints from Chris, and Elizabeth has been doing her usual fantastic job of photo-taking. Her series of photos of lessons make us all feel like we are watching the whole lesson…and have been an invaluable teaching aid to Sue.

There’s been plenty of relaxation on the lake too! Amber had to rest her foot!

Chris, Sue, Michael, Beth and Amber headed up to the showground before us. John, Caitrin, Kaya, and Tre and I came up later. Kaya stayed up to be with Amber and proved herself a good groom. Noel watched the Shop and gave farm tours to interested potential Morgan Horse purchasers ; Kathy watered the greenhouse; and Tim P. tended to the critters while we were gone. We came back early to be back on the farm, etc…but got to see a few folks while we were there.

Ann Canavan was helping run the Lippitt Morgan booth. John got to see her a bit more than I did. I only got to wave to her before we left to return home.

We did a tour of the KY Horse Park with the family for Amber’s birthday. The museum is terrific…but there was A LOT of Arab info…they are having a Special Exhibit. Not enough Morgan Horse info…We’ll have to go back once the Morgan Horse Museum is fully open and displays set-up. We didn’t have time for the Saddlebred Museum either.

The showground gets better and better. We’ve been there over the years on vacations. But this was the first time that we’ve been there showing.

It was also our first Class A Morgan Horse Show since 1988. It was good to see old friends and make new ones. The Show Committee did a spectacular job; and Mrs. Singer said that they never had a meeting!

Amber made Sue a photo album as a thank you present. I haven’t gotten to see the album yet…but from the look on Sue and Chris’ faces in Beth’s photos, it seems that they liked it!